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Thread: Saw frame for a beginner.

  1. #1
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    Default Saw frame for a beginner.

    Well guys, i think the time might have come for me to buy a saw frame. I want to saw little flower shapes etc, probably not going to cut anything thicker than 1.5mm mm. I'm left handed and don't have much upper body strength. I love the look of the green lion saw frame (on cooksons) but it's expensive, should i go cheap and cheerful? What would you recommend for a beginner. Also need a bench block i can screw onto my breakfast bar. Hope I won't regret getting serious with the cutting Thanks, sheena

  2. #2
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    I don't have a Green Lion; I do have several KC saws, Eclipses and Grobet. TBH, when I can pierce, I usually grab the Grobet. I've got the adjustable one, but I don't think I've ever adjusted it - the idea of using broken blades in it is a non-starter (I do use them in much smaller sawframes though).

    https://www.cooksongold.com/Jeweller...prcode-999-73A

    As for bench pegs, I've got a spare one of these - https://www.cooksongold.com/Jeweller...prcode-999-082
    But by the time shipping's covered you'd probably be as well off getting one direct from Cooksons.
    Last edited by ps_bond; 26-10-2018 at 02:43 PM.

  3. #3
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    I started with an eclipse and have a KC. I do miss being able to use broken saw blades in the KC but have got used to it now after a few problems. I’ve wondered about the Green Lion in the past and Cookson stocking it is a temptation!

  4. #4
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    I found that trying to use the broken blades threw my sawing off because of the shorter stroke destroying the rhythm. YMMV, of course. The Anderson sawframes are quite handy under the scope (or the one on the laser).

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by ps_bond View Post
    I found that trying to use the broken blades threw my sawing off because of the shorter stroke destroying the rhythm. YMMV, of course. The Anderson sawframes are quite handy under the scope (or the one on the laser).
    Well you know I’m a Scot Peter! They were usually just with an end broken off or not doing anything particularly precise but now I’ve grown accustomed to the KC I haven’t used the eclipse in a while

  6. #6
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    My screw on bench block came from Proops and cost 11.50 and it's great screwed onto my kitchen worktop, the anvil part of it wasn't entirely smooth but I've got a couple of decent steel bench blocks so that's not really an issue. And I got a cheap saw frame from BlueSkyComponents on eBay (screw on bench block came from eBay too) that came with loads of cheap blades in different sizes and to be honest they seem to work just as well as the more expensive blades I've bought. In fact the Vallorbe blades I bought seem to break more often than the cheap ones but I don't do a lot of piercing and my technique probably needs a bit of work. I dare say that the more expensive frames are probably worth the money but for me my cheapies work brilliantly, just a smidge over 20 for both the frame (and blades) and bench block was totally justifiable for me.

  7. #7
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    Sheena, I would suggest you buy a simple saw frame, like the one in my picture. It will last for ever. The only other suggestion is that you get one with a 4" throat, so that you can navigate larger sheets of metal.

    Much more important will be to get good quality saw blades such as Vallorbe, because any frame can only work as well as the little toothy thing you insert. For a start you can probably make do with only size 4/0.

    Lastly you will need a screw-on bench peg. At the risk of bringing down the wrath of some members, I heartily endorse this one from Cousins, which has holes and slots, for fine fiddly work. I even take mine when I work away from home, to the envy of colleagues. BTW, ideally bench pegs for piercing are flat, not sloping.
    https://www.cousinsuk.com/product/bench-pegs Dennis.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Capture s.JPG   Fancy Bench Peg.jpg  

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis View Post
    Sheena, I would suggest you buy a simple saw frame, like the one in my picture. It will last for ever. The only other suggestion is that you get one with a 4" throat, so that you can navigate larger sheets of metal.

    Much more important will be to get good quality saw blades such as Vallorbe, because any frame can only work as well as the little toothy thing you insert. For a start you can probably make do with only size 4/0.

    Lastly you will need a screw-on bench peg. At the risk of bringing down the wrath of some members, I heartily endorse this one from Cousins, which has holes and slots, for fine fiddly work. I even take mine when I work away from home, to the envy of colleagues. BTW, ideally bench pegs for piercing are flat, not sloping.
    https://www.cousinsuk.com/product/bench-pegs Dennis.
    That looks a good peg Dennis and at that price I wouldn’t mind buying from Cousins. I have a homemade flat oak one I made that’s on the left hand side of my bench and I do seem to use it more than the other one maybe that’s why

  9. #9
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    Thanks everyone, lots of food for thought. Pete i love the look of your grobet and it's not too expensive (compared to the green lion), though Dennis the one you suggested is probably the one i should be buying. Choices, choices. Will definitly check out the cousins block. Looks so differant from the usual v shape will need to consider if i can understand how to use it. Will be checking out everyone's recommendations. Big thanks

  10. #10
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    The Eclipse are still really good, but I tend to prefer the frame rigidity of the Grobet. I would caution that the Grobet's clamps can be a bit twitchy about getting filings in them, which the Eclipse frames don't suffer from.
    The other option for a pin would be to cut one from plywood... A G clamp to hold it to the edge of a table and you're away. I have some I made that are on short posts so I can clamp them in a vice for piercing too (like my blacksmithing post vices).

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