Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Transferring an Image to metal.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    53

    Default Transferring an Image to metal.

    This has been a hassle for me for a long time.
    You need a laser printer.
    Attachment 6601
    Then you make your design and print it on normal copy paper.
    Attachment 6602
    Then you sand down the metal and cut your design out.
    Attachment 6603
    Then you put it face down on the metal and wet it with a cloth and lacquer thinners.
    Attachment 6604
    Done, and it does not rub off.
    For a more detailed description, check out my latest blog post.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Manchester
    Posts
    632

    Default

    Thanks for this, Hans, and your blog generally, which is invaluable to people like me.
    When you say lacquer thinners, I'm not sure whether this is perhaps known by another name in the UK. Or is lacquer thinners a generic name including things like cellulose thinners, acetone et al?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Rural Somerset, between Yeovil and Shepton Mallet
    Posts
    201

    Default Transferring an Image to metal.

    I have done a bit of etching where you use etch resist paper to transfer a laser printed image onto sliver - "Print-n-Peel" and then place in etch solution to erode away the exposed silver.

    After a bit of research I have found that if you use photograph printing paper it works just as well. Apart from etching I have used this method to transfer an image onto silver sheet.

    The basic process is:-
    1. Get a black and white image you want to use from the internet or a scanned photo.
    2. Use software to reverse the image - that is to get a mirror image (flip horizontal in Microsoft Paint)
    3, Print onto shiny photographic paper using a laser printer
    4. Clean the silver with wire wool and place the paper face down onto the silver sheet.
    5. Place a sheet of newspaper over the back of the photographic paper and using a normal iron (NOT with steam ) heat up the sandwich of silver, photo paper, newspaper for about 3 - 4 minutes
    6. Let the whole lot cool and then carefully peel the photopaper from the silver and you will find the image perfectly transerred to the silver

    It sounds a bit complicated but is actually very simple and after a few tries you will get it to work 100% every time.

    If I have time tomorrow I'll post some photos of the process - it really works very well.

    Have a look at the Andrew Berry video on etching using Print 'n Peel for the basic process (but you don't need to use the expensive Print n' Peel paper and you will not need to reverse the image - making the white black and the black white for etching resist)
    Barry the Flying Silversmith👍

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    53

    Default

    Or is lacquer thinners a generic name including things like cellulose thinners

    Yep the same. Acetone works OK but thinners is better.

    Barry,
    The hot iron does work well indeed, but there is the ironing and pulling off that's a real hassle.
    I have done a lot of etching using both Print and Peel and copy paper methods.

    Thing is, while the method I described is not good for large areas, it is quick and cheap for tiny images of less than 20mm square.
    And this is the thing.
    The laser ink is not the absolute clearest, but when one is piercing enamel cells that have a 0.5mm divide between them
    is works really well.
    Or for instance if one has to pierce out letters for a name tag.
    And if you make a mistake, it's only a minute to redo the image.
    The methods you describe I have used very successfully as well, it's just that for small images I personally like this method.
    Until a better one comes along, that is.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Rural Somerset, between Yeovil and Shepton Mallet
    Posts
    201

    Default Transferring an Image to metal.

    You are quite right that you should use the method that works best for you, there is no "right"way only the best way for YOU - as we say different strokes for different folks. Having use the paper transfer method several times without a problem it works for me - even for small images.

    Laser printer toner, as you say, can be a bit "blurry", I only buy manufacturers original cartridges and, fortunatley, my printer allows you to adjust the image and heat settings to get a crisp image.
    Last edited by BarryM; 15-09-2014 at 07:53 AM.
    Barry the Flying Silversmith👍

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    England
    Posts
    1,899

    Default

    Perhaps my methods are considered old fashioned, but when transferring my designs to metals for piercing I use this method. I bright polish the metals surface, de grease the polished surface, paint the metal with white poster paint, draw my design on tracing paper, then I use carbon copy paper between the traced design and metal and trace the design lines with a hard pencil. Now the design is drawn on the metal I mark in the design with a scriber before finally washing off the white paint, leaving my design clear on the polished surface metal. On a special job I will then engrave the design before piercing.

    If I am making an item with a repeat design, such as my bowl piercings, I use the carbon paper method to mark out the copper patterns which I then pierce out and use to mark the designs around the bowl surface using a scriber to mark the design before engraving pre piercing.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	105 Copper patterns for piercings.jpg 
Views:	48 
Size:	50.7 KB 
ID:	6605Click image for larger version. 

Name:	196a Bowl overlay.jpg 
Views:	44 
Size:	34.2 KB 
ID:	6606Click image for larger version. 

Name:	196d Bowl overlay both sides.jpg 
Views:	41 
Size:	32.8 KB 
ID:	6607

    James

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    724

    Default

    There are countless discussions on the engraving forums about this.
    One method especially for awkward surfaces is to draw directly onto the metal, this can be the quickest & easiest way.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Northeast UK
    Posts
    821

    Default

    Lots of useful suggestions there, and personally its a great help to a novice like me. Thanks everyone.

    Nick

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    268

    Default

    Another way of transferring the resist from photopaper/PnP is to use a laminator to run the "sandwich" through, easier than an iron. Assuming you have a suitable laminator of course!

    Carin
    Carin Lindberg

    Camali Design
    www.camalidesign.com

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    2,068

    Default

    Thanks for sharing all the great ideas!
    I normally just draw straight on but complicated symmetry is tricky for me so its great to have other options.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •