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Thread: Hallmarking Q. Just a little one

  1. #21
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    We still have hallmarking, it is done by the individual jeweller or company producing the item, as you make the piece, plus the makers mark

  2. #22
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    But if the metal isn't tested that is no guarantee of anything.
    Im with Caroline, I like the hallmark and even have non UK items marked.
    If nothing else it gives me proof if a customer reacts to the silver/gold that it is not my fault and it is genuine.

  3. #23
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    Yes basically it is a honor system although if you knowingly falsely mark a item you are the guilty of fraud and can be fined or jailed. I mark every thing plus I put my maker mark as well, plus

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by enigma View Post
    If nothing else it gives me proof if a customer reacts to the silver/gold that it is not my fault and it is genuine.
    I don't think a hallmark gives you proof of anything more than precious metal content. I've read a post from someone else who thought a Hallmark was a strong defense against an allergic reaction claim. Only a nickel content and release test would be proof your metal satisfies the laws set down in the EU Nickel directive.

  5. #25
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    One of the reasons I do not buy Precious metal from Ebay etc. is that mostly it is not traceable, I buy from established companies that have a lot to loose if they supply dodgy Metal.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by china View Post
    One of the reasons I do not buy Precious metal from Ebay etc. is that mostly it is not traceable, I buy from established companies that have a lot to loose if they supply dodgy Metal.
    "Dodgy" has various meanings depending on the end use. Metal can meet the minimum precious metal content and have very high nickel content and not be considered dodgy. It is only dodgy if the seller advertises it as jewellery or something else that will come into prolonged contact with skin. Hallmarking laws in the U.K only specify the minimum precious metal content, the remainder is 'other metal'. So what is dodgy?

  7. #27
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    Thats the point - it is proof of precious metal content.
    I can't be responsible for somebody having an allergy to sterling 925 or gold 375 but I can be responsible for ensuring that is what I have sold them.

  8. #28
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    2 years ago I purchased some "jewellery grade" sterling silver from a ebay seller in China, it clearly did not behave like sterling silver luckily back the I had a friend who could analyze such things
    the report came back as 43% silver 31 % Cadmium 26% low grade copper. That is what I call "DODGY"

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by enigma View Post
    Thats the point - it is proof of precious metal content.
    I can't be responsible for somebody having an allergy to sterling 925 or gold 375 but I can be responsible for ensuring that is what I have sold them.
    I wouldn't be so sure about that. You are responsible for making sure any jewellery you sell meets the nickel release standard. It says so right here:

    What is the Current Legislation?

    Current Legislation states that any manufacturer, importer, wholesaler or retailer will be breaking the law if:

    1. They sell jewellery products or clothing fasteners that fail to have a non-nickel coating, unless the rate of nickel release of the parts of product that come in direct contact with the skin does not exceed 0.5g/cm2/week for at least two years normal use of the item.
    2. They sell a piercing assembly, intended to be inserted in to a pierced part of the body, with a nickel release rate higher than 0.2g/cm2/week.


    In order to support the legislation and ensure products comply, they must be tested to the correct British Standards, BS EN 1811:1998 and BS EN 12472.




    As far as I understand, getting an item hallmarked does not mean it has passed the nickel release test.

  10. #30
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    Not something I would worry about when I buy all my bullion from Cooksons though
    I was referring to people who are allergic to non dodgy bullion lol.

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