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Thread: Which DSLR camera?

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by NickD View Post
    Perfect James. Thanks for your explanations. I wanted to make sure before buying.
    Cheers,
    Nick
    Keep the Exposure Triangle handy whenever taking pictures!

    exposure-triangle-making-sense-aperture-shutter-speed-iso/

  2. #22
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    Mar 2016
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    Quote Originally Posted by handmadeblanks View Post
    Keep the Exposure Triangle handy whenever taking pictures!

    exposure-triangle-making-sense-aperture-shutter-speed-iso/
    OK. Thanks. All advice very much appreciated.
    Nick

  3. #23
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    Sep 2019
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    A bit late to the party for this one, but...

    I just bought a Canon Powershot SX720HS, to replace the one that I dropped (which would have survived, if the lens hadn't been scratched when it hit the ground).

    Not a DSLR, but a fantastic little camera nonetheless. Great macro capability (you can get as close as 1 centimetre to the subject) and excellent image stabilisation (I've managed to get crisp, handheld images at a 0.5 second shutter speed). It has a 40x optical zoom, too and shoots full HD video at 60fps.

    There are also some good deals to be had at the moment - I paid 199 for a bundle including battery, charger, pocket tripod and a fairly decent carry case. The 730 and 740 have more bells and whistles, but the same lens and sensor.

  4. #24
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    Feb 2020
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    Quote Originally Posted by roxics View Post
    Hello

    I'm thinking about investing in a decent camera to better document my and my friends adventures / climbing / lives. I am not the slightest bit techie so didn't know what to look for therefore I have looked to friends for assistance.
    As I am not very techy I don't want a complicated camera or one that's heavy however having looked at both reviews, both appear to be light weight .
    I have had compact/bridge cameras in the past and enjoy taking photographs so I am wanting to get more creative with photography but more importantly want a clearer more detailed photogrpah.
    What a big can of worms you've opened here - theres lots of choices and no doubt there will passionate advocates for each option.

    So will you be partaking in the climbing and adventure part? Are you looking to take videos or just stills?

    If you're hanging off a cliff you might be a tad preoccupied (and ran out of spare hands) to hold, focus and shoot a full frame DSLR camera so if this is going to be you main use you might want to look at an action camera which has a smaller sensor (this means it won't be as good in low light) but a large depth of field (more things in focus automatically) and can easily be strapped to your head.

    If, however, you plan to keep your feet on terror firma then you'll be wanting a camera set up with a decent zoom and here is where you enter Pans Labrynth - its so easy to get lost.

    Are you going to be marching all over the place or will everything come straight out the car, snap and then straight in again? How you plan to use the camera will dictate choices in lens and camera.

    Do you mind a big bulky set up or would you be wanting a small and lightweight system.

    One superzoom lens to do it all or do you want to have interchangeable lenses?

    For many the Full Frame DSLR is the pinnacle, but these can be big and bulky. DSLRs have a mirror set up which adds bulk - you could look at mirrorless cameras which dispense with the mirror and either are smaller or use that space for other things (extra heat sinking, processing, memory, etc)

    Read up on full sensors and crop sensors on the net but for a very brief explanation here goes:

    A "Full frame sensor Camera" has an image sensor that is the same size as a 35mm film negative frame.

    A crop sensor has an image sensor that is smaller than the 35mm frame. Because it is smaller then for a given lens size the crop sensor will only see a section of the image than a full size - this basically means that it gets an instant magnification for the lens which is given by its crop factor - e.g. I have a Micro Four Thirds sensor - its sensor has a crop factor of 2 (this basically means that I multiply the lens I'm using by 2) . If I use a 100 to 300mm lens and multiply the lengths by 2 so it gives the same field of view as a 200-600mm lens on a full frame camera

    HOWEVER because my sensor doesn't use the full image, my lens doesn't need to project the full image back into the camera so it can be made smaller and lighter using less glass so for the equivalent full size lens (albeit not necessarily cheaper because the lens must be able to project a clear image onto the smaller sensor)

    So to sum up my ramblings - you will first need to define your main usage of the camera down to the microscopic .

    Full Frame cameras can produce great photos but their set ups can also be big, bulky and heavy .
    Cropped Sensors systems can be alot smaller and lighter for the same field of view, but won't have the same low light performance. They also produce a deeper depth of view - i.e. more things will be in focus. This might not be a problem depending on what you want to photograph.

    DSLR cameras are larger and heavier, mirrorless cameras can be smaller and lighter.

    If you don't want the expence/hassle/headache of having extra lenses then a bridge or superzoom camera might be the way to go.

    Are you looking more for photos/videos/both as this will change the playing field quite a bit.



    But there is one thing that doesn't look as it it's been covered.

    Over the last few years the cameras inside smart phones have improved to such a degree that i[hone footage has been used by holy-wood producers. Add on lenses have also improves in leaps and bounds so that now these add on lenses still produce good quality images. A modest set up of adding on a wide angle, 2x and 4x telephoto plus a case that allows these to be screwed in would give a decent set up - ad to that the fact that you almost always have your phone with you.

  5. #25
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    jay-ell - there's some excellent advice there - thank you, but the thread is over a year old (it's just been bumped up by yesterday's necropost) and the OP hasn't been back to the forum since they first asked. I suspect they were not here in any seriousness to start with.

  6. #26
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    "necropost" so that that's what you call it, today was not wasted I learnt something

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by mizgeorge View Post
    I suspect they were not here in any seriousness to start with.
    I'd agree.

    I've started picking over the article linked to by the necroposter, but so far it seems to be very poorly written, with nothing but the occasional vague, generic hint.

  8. #28
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    Feb 2020
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    Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK
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    Quote Originally Posted by mizgeorge View Post
    jay-ell - there's some excellent advice there - thank you, but the thread is over a year old (it's just been bumped up by yesterday's necropost) and the OP hasn't been back to the forum since they first asked. I suspect they were not here in any seriousness to start with.
    I realised that just after hitting post. Oops.

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