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Thread: Pickle - what's best and how to dispose of it

  1. #1
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    Default Pickle - what's best and how to dispose of it

    Hello all!

    A question around the fun topic of pickle.. what pickle do people use and how do you dispose of it?

    I currently use Picklean which is good as it can be put down a normal drain. However, I've somehow run out (&#128561 but I've got a pot of this (https://www.cooksongold.com/Jeweller...rcode-998-240A) - its called safety pickle but what is the best way to dispose of it? Does it have to go as hazardous waste??

    I've seen people use Alum Powder - how do you throw it away?

    What do people find as the best solution to use for pickling?

    Thank you!
    Beth

  2. #2
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    Hi Vitty,
    We all have our favourite pickling solution. Mine is hot alum, because it works quickly, leaves silver beautifully pale and is not toxic to begin with.
    However the problem is not just the safety of new pickle, but that once used it becomes loaded with a copper salt which is toxic and not at all environmentally friendly.
    Disposal becomes a dilemma and there is no perfect answer, as you will see here: https://www.google.com/search?q=disp...ient=firefox-b

    Welcome to the forum. Dennis.

  3. #3
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    I pour my alum solution into the gravel path in the garden

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    Ok Some one convince me that Alum ( Potassium Aluminium Sulfate) is better than Sodium Bisulphate

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vitty View Post
    I currently use Picklean which is good as it can be put down a normal drain.
    While you can pour it down the drain - don't. Cooksons should have updated their guidelines by now to recommend against this. You can pour any liquid down the drain, but that doesn't mean you should.
    Copper - which is what is dissolved into your pickle when it turns blue - is classed as a toxic heavy metal and should not be dumped into water systems.

    Neutralise it, dry it and take it to a tip with suitable disposal facilities. BANES website should be able to provide guidance on where.

    As for alum vs bisulphate, the whole "safe" pickle thing is a nonsense. None of them are non-toxic (they may have much lower LD50 scores) and all of them are nasty once you've used them.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by ps_bond View Post
    As for alum vs bisulphate, the whole "safe" pickle thing is a nonsense. None of them are non-toxic (they may have much lower LD50 scores) and all of them are nasty once you've used them.
    The traditional pickle for jewellers is sulphuric acid. Even tiny splashes can leave holes in your clothing, work top and flooring. So I do think there is a valid use for the term 'safety pickle', which won't do that.

    Some safety pickles are even edible in small quantities, for instance alum and lemon juice/citric acid, so for some this would add an additional layer of safety.

    As already stated, the problem arises once used. Dennis.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis View Post
    Some safety pickles are even edible in small quantities, for instance alum and lemon juice/citric acid, so for some this would add an additional layer of safety.
    Strangely, none of my workshop chemicals are selected on the basis of whether or not I can eat them. If that's a serious selection criterion then perhaps an individual should question their understanding of basic workshop practice.

  8. #8
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    When alum is sold on amazon under the Indian food section, in fact it’s the only way I’ve found you can buy it, it does imply that it’s safe and not everyone is as savvy as you Peter

  9. #9
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    One of the reasons I use Sodium Bisulphate is I buy for my spa at a quarter the cost jewellers suppliers sell it as you say it is all toxic once used, I normally leave the spent liquid out side in a open container and the sun evaporates the liquid when I have enough I bag it in a plastic bag and seal, then I can take to a dump that accepts toxic waste like paint etc. Alum is readily available here from a chemical supplier.
    Last edited by china; 03-12-2018 at 11:09 AM.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by CJ57 View Post
    When alum is sold on amazon under the Indian food section, in fact it’s the only way I’ve found you can buy it, it does imply that it’s safe and not everyone is as savvy as you Peter
    Caustic soda is sold in Chinese grocers for food use too. It's only "safe" if you use it carefully - safe is a relative term, not an absolute.

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