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Thread: Pickle - what's best and how to dispose of it

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Bath
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    Hi Peter,
    Thank for the response - although it did freak me out a little. I couldn't work out how you knew BANES was my local council - then I realised that your location is in the right-hand corner! I have never noticed that before

    I'll stop pouring my Picklean down the drain then - I'll go down the neutralise option and find a suitable disposal facility. Having dry crystals will be easier to manage than liquid!

    With the whole "safe" pickle discussion - I remember the time my Mum was admiring my slow cooker and asking what I was cooking in it. Very quickly told her it wasn't for food and not to use it in any circumstance!!

  2. #12
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    Jan 2010
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    Bath
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis View Post
    Hi Vitty,
    We all have our favourite pickling solution. Mine is hot alum, because it works quickly, leaves silver beautifully pale and is not toxic to begin with.
    However the problem is not just the safety of new pickle, but that once used it becomes loaded with a copper salt which is toxic and not at all environmentally friendly.
    Disposal becomes a dilemma and there is no perfect answer, as you will see here: https://www.google.com/search?q=disp...ient=firefox-b

    Welcome to the forum. Dennis.
    Thanks Dennis - I think I'll give it a go as it seems to be a popular option.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
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    Romsey
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vitty View Post
    Hi Peter,
    Thank for the response - although it did freak me out a little. I couldn't work out how you knew BANES was my local council - then I realised that your location is in the right-hand corner! I have never noticed that before
    Sorry - used to live there, know BANES and their antics well!

  4. #14
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    Dec 2009
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    Central London
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    Quote Originally Posted by ps_bond View Post
    Strangely, none of my workshop chemicals are selected on the basis of whether or not I can eat them. If that's a serious selection criterion then perhaps an individual should question their understanding of basic workshop practice.
    This subject has been well and truly talked out, so I hope you will forgive me for having one more go:

    Many of our members work from home, where there might be pets and children waiting to slip into the forbidden work space out of curiosity or devilment.

    Obviously they are looking to use chemicals that won't cause serous injury at the first lick. Dennis.

  5. #15
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    Romsey
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    Whereas I take the attitude that rather than subscribe to false notions of safety, proper workshop practice includes controlling access to all workshop chemicals.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis View Post
    This subject has been well and truly talked out, so I hope you will forgive me for having one more go:

    Many of our members work from home, where there might be pets and children waiting to slip into the forbidden work space out of curiosity or devilment.

    Obviously they are looking to use chemicals that won't cause serous injury at the first lick. Dennis.
    That sprung to my mind too. I wouldnt leave out to evaporate, i have a cat but i suppose if you put it under some chicken wire cage type thing so living things cant get to it...


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