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Thread: Rolling mill. What setup would be best for me

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    29

    Default Rolling mill. What setup would be best for me

    Hello all

    My husband has rather generously offered to buy me a rolling mill - I want to be sure that the setup I get is useful not only for the projects I am doing now but also hopefully as I develop.

    I've only ever used a mill for texturing and at least initially this would be my main use of it. However I understand that they can be used in recycling metal which is definitely something I am interested in. And possibly other uses I'm not aware of yet?

    I presume I want some sort of combi mill with rollers that are half flat half wire roller - unless it's easy to change out the rollers?

    Looking at both the Cookson mill and more expensive Durstons inc the combi mini mills (presumably you can change the rollers out on these? or are you stuck with the rollers that come with it)

    I am not likely to need a large roller area for texturing (heavy cuffs etc?) as I'm predominantly interested in more delicate pieces of jewellery.

    Your thoughts and advice would be v welcome as I want to buy once and buy right

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    1,501

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    If you wish to buy once and buy right then yes go with the type that has the grooves for wire, some of these you can add rollers on the outside (Durston and Pepe) they will do what you want to do and more and if your budget is fit enough to go for a Durston or similar then that is the way to go, the budget ones in my opinion are not for serious work.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Central London
    Posts
    8,246

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    Unless you are the patient sort (not me), you will shirk changing rollers, so that you can get on.

    The point of a large flat area, is that you can accumulate offcuts of textured stock and choose them when needed. Dennis.
    Last edited by Dennis; 31-10-2018 at 12:29 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Posts
    29

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    Definitely not patient and I have a low tolerance for fiddling with tools setting them up. From both of your helpful comments it sounds like a geared machine with combi flat/grooved rollers is the way to go.

    I expect this is a stupid question but is this a satisfactory geared machine: https://www.cooksongold.com/Jeweller...mbi&channel=uk

    Or is the wheel at the top really adding something: https://www.cooksongold.com/Jeweller...mbi&channel=uk

    It looks to be easier to calibrate which is maybe a positive thing for getting consistent depth of imprints etc. Not sure whether that justifies an extra 500 quid or so mind!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    232

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    Quote Originally Posted by belette View Post
    Definitely not patient and I have a low tolerance for fiddling with tools setting them up. From both of your helpful comments it sounds like a geared machine with combi flat/grooved rollers is the way to go.

    I expect this is a stupid question but is this a satisfactory geared machine: https://www.cooksongold.com/Jeweller...mbi&channel=uk

    Or is the wheel at the top really adding something: https://www.cooksongold.com/Jeweller...mbi&channel=uk

    It looks to be easier to calibrate which is maybe a positive thing for getting consistent depth of imprints etc. Not sure whether that justifies an extra 500 quid or so mind!
    The model number normally indicates the width of the roller. The C130 has 130mm wide main rollers, plus extension rollers (the ones on the outside). It also has a 5:1 gearbox rather than 4:1 like the C110. This is why it is more expensive. I have the C130 and even with a 5:1 gearbox it can be hard work rolling sheet that is more than 25mm wide.

    These videos might help

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PJuM-lRTcW4


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PQJKFP05MuM

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Central London
    Posts
    8,246

    Default

    The device at the top, for closing the gap does not require much effort, whether it's a wheel or a cross bar.

    As for the calibrations, I really don't understand them, as they appear to read differently when you return to the same gap. Over the years, I have learned to work entirely by feel, making sure that the rollers grip firmly, but dont require brute force to turn them, at the risk of getting hopelessly stuck.

    As mentioned by handmadeblanks, thicker materials still require a lot of work, even with gears, so it is best at first to anneal at every pass and close the rollers more gradually. Dennis.

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