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Thread: The cheat's way

  1. #1
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    Default The cheat's way

    Thought it would be interesting to start a thread on getting away with bad behaviour. Is there something you do that you know you shouldn't, or is there something you are told not to do but get away with.
    In my recent efforts making stud earrings firstly i've been sticking some work hardened textured silver into a brass doming block (naughty me probably on the journey to damaging my block) secondly without pickling between solderings i've just sanded a patch of oxidisation off the back and soldered on the stud.
    Love to hear yours, sheena

  2. #2
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    I don't think you are sinning hard enough Shena.

    Your brass cube should easily withstand a bit of use as you describe. After all, it's a tool not an ornament.
    That said, it will work better if the silver is annealed, and the texture will be better maintained by using wooden punches. So will the shape of the cube.

    As for needless time wasted in pickling: provided you flux all future areas to be soldered, you need only quench with water in-between and re-flux for the next operation. Or, as you say, you can sand or glass brush them.

    At the college I attend part time, we have just had delivered a beautiful Durston double rolling mill. The first person to scratch it will be a true sinner. Dennis.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 53917.jpg  

  3. #3
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    Where 's the motor?

  4. #4
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    Dennis you're a mine of information will keep the fluxing of future areas to be soldered in mind. Durston rolling mill: a thing of beauty, i'd be giving the first person to scratch it the evil eye. I do love my tools. Though saying that once it's scratched you can relax

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by china View Post
    Where 's the motor?
    It's a green machine, powered by students.

  6. #6
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    The thing is we all take short cuts if they work for you over the years and it becomes the norm rather than cheating, I find it quite difficult to judge as what I was taught is often quite different to what people believe now so sometimes my norm people raise their hands in horror.

    I have manage not to mark my Durston rolling mill yet although a fresh leaf was not a good idea and needed quick work. The stakes on the planishing set are another thing, I was really upset when the first hammer mark appeared and they were no longer as pristine

  7. #7
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    I like to think of it less as cheating and more being creative in how you approach something There's more than one way to skin a cat, right?
    My favourite cheat/creative approach is to use a manicure motor, cheap as chips on Ebay at less than 15 instead of a more expensive micromotor machine. It's not likely to last a lifetime but I'm not making items to sell so it seemed silly to spend a lot of money and it's brilliant. With the addition of a cheap quick release head that takes wider shanks it does a great job.

    And I totally love small scratch eraser drums meant for the JoolTool - they do a lovely job of burnishing down bezels once they've been pushed down properly with a traditional burnishing tool and are fabulous for smoothing edges after filing and sanding.

  8. #8
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    As said above, I don't think it is cheating it is just a different method to achieve the same result, in fact without this there would be no innovation. I have been using the green machine version although it seems this may have to change, I have permanently injured my Bicep and may have to go for a motor, the good thing is it looks as though I can retrofit, I have not mange to scratch mine yet (touch Wood)

  9. #9
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    It hurts when your brand new tools are christened but it has to be done

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by misspond View Post
    I like to think of it less as cheating and more being creative in how you approach something There's more than one way to skin a cat, right?
    My favourite cheat/creative approach is to use a manicure motor, cheap as chips on Ebay at less than 15 instead of a more expensive micromotor machine. It's not likely to last a lifetime but I'm not making items to sell so it seemed silly to spend a lot of money and it's brilliant. With the addition of a cheap quick release head that takes wider shanks it does a great job.

    And I totally love small scratch eraser drums meant for the JoolTool - they do a lovely job of burnishing down bezels once they've been pushed down properly with a traditional burnishing tool and are fabulous for smoothing edges after filing and sanding.
    Dennis recommended one of those cheap micro motors for me too and i love it. Though i spent a little bit more on mine than you did. Going to go and investigate the scratch eraser drums you mentioned they sound useful

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