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Thread: In Praise of Waterproof Pens

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Central London
    Posts
    7,686

    Default In Praise of Waterproof Pens

    My water proof pen, the kind that will write on shiny surfaces, is always within reach. Preferably a red one so that it is not easily mislaid. They’re brilliant:

    1. For soldering multiple jump rings, where it might be difficult to see a well closed joint, small red marks can indicate exactly where to place the solder and speed the process.
    2. When trimming the surplus back plate around a bezel cup. A red line in the angle between the two, will help to pierce it more accurately and avoid unwanted undercuts.
    3. It is often important to have a bezel the right way up, or even an addition for sweat soldering, so red marks can signal ‘top’
    4. Lastly, marking centres, making parallel lines, or cross-marks on the metal, or the soldering block, will ensure that parts are correctly aligned prior to soldering.

    The red marks burn away and will not interfere with soldering. If you make a mistake, they can be removed from metal with a little meths on a cloth, or from a brick with a torch.
    If you have found other uses, please add them here. Dennis.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Rp2 The Red Line.jpg   Rp1 Grid On Well Used Block.jpg  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    232

    Default

    1. I use a black fine tip Sharpie to mark out the shapes on silver sheet before cutting them out with a disc cutter. Doing it this way allows you to position the shapes in such a way to produce the highest yield from your sheet. Although I am considering using an engineer's scriber now.
    2. I have also marked the shank of the drill bit I use for jump ring holes with a red Sharpie. It allows for quick identification from a set where the size increments are difficult to distinguish with the naked eye. I was constantly checking with a Vernier Caliper, now I just get the red.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    England
    Posts
    1,885

    Default

    I use Stabilo "Write 4 all" fine permanent marker pens, they are fine pointed and are good for drawing around stencil type patterns. See; https://www.stabilo.com/com/products...o-write-4-all/

    James

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    512

    Default

    Thanks for the link, coming from a drawing background, a like a fine precision line i have been using a ultra fine sharpie so far.
    Last edited by Sheen; 27-06-2018 at 06:22 AM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Cardiff
    Posts
    988

    Default

    I go through fine black Sharpies like no-one's business. I also would like a lie-detector test to find out which child of mine 'borrowed' my technical drawing pens and lost them. (I have my suspicions).

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Central London
    Posts
    7,686

    Default

    Hi, Lydia, happy you're back.
    One member recently asked about a spare barrel for stone tumbling, so that she could share her Lortone with her children. Can you imagine the friction? Dennis.

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