Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 21

Thread: Micro torch

Hybrid View

Previous Post Previous Post   Next Post Next Post
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    17

    Question Micro torch

    Hi, I'm a newbie and this is my first thread! I'm looking to set up my own little work bench at home to practice some of my recently learned skills. I'm just getting so confused when it comes to purchasing a micro torch. I will be using it for both soldering small pieces such as jump rings but would also like to solder larger pieces like bangles. Do I need two torches or is there one that would cover all of this? Is it worth spending the extra money to buy a proxxon (for the small pieces) and max flame or iroda pt500 (for larger pieces) or will a cheap cooks torch do the exact same job. Which torches do you recommend? Thank you

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    1,709

    Default

    I would recommend the Smiths little torch, which will cover all that however they are expensive and require gas cylinders, many people seem get along ok with a simple LPG torch, although from my experience when it come to melting
    metal and heating large pieces they struggle.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    2,068

    Default

    Another recommendation for the Smiths torch from me although if it is out of budget then the Sievert would be my second choice.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Derbyshire
    Posts
    130

    Default

    I started a couple of months ago with a soldering torch from b&q that cost about 13 and was powered by an aerosol sized gas can. I used it successfully for annealing, soldering ring joints and balling ends of wire but even though it claimed to have a 'fine flame' in reality it was far too fierce for anything requiring real precision. Also though it wasn't heavy it was a little bulky in the hand.

    This week I've bought the basic jewellers hand torch from Cooksons and have tested it out on a few projects - it is infinitely better, definitely worth the extra money and at 28 it is still very affordable. It runs on butane lighter fuel that I can buy in my local corner shop, which is also very handy.
    http://www.cooksongold.com/Jewellery...prcode-999-955
    Using this torch I can now make pieces with more than one solder joint and as an added bonus I no longer feel the need to clear my entire work bench for fear of accidentally setting fire to the stuff around me! From my test pieces so far, I think i'll be able to do a lot of different projects with this torch and it doesn't feel like I'm going to outgrow it any time soon.
    I don't think it would be up to the job of melting things for casting, but that might actually be something the b&q one turns out to be good for. I also haven't used metal clay yet so I don't know how it would cope with torch firing those sorts of pieces, though I suspect it might not be great for that.

    Longer term I think torches powered by the big gas cylinders may well be more cost effective for the fuel and they will perform a greater range of tasks, but its a much bigger investment at the outset. As a beginner there are likely to be are lots of other shiny things you'll want to buy too so my best advice is to have a good think about what else you want/need besides the torch before you splash out on one really expensive tool.
    Hazel

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    2,068

    Default

    A hand held micro torch wouldn't be able to solder bangles unless perhaps very thin ones, hence why I didn't consider that as an option for Leanne albeit a far cheaper alternative.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Derbyshire
    Posts
    130

    Default

    I did wonder whether the hand torches would do the thicker metal of bangles, they're not something i've tried to make so far. Actually as long as its not anything super delicate on a bangle the b&q one might do the job for me as I've already got it, though its not one I'd recommend for anyone choosing new tools for themselves.
    Hazel

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Posts
    232

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LeanneMary92 View Post
    Hi, I'm a newbie and this is my first thread! I'm looking to set up my own little work bench at home to practice some of my recently learned skills. I'm just getting so confused when it comes to purchasing a micro torch. I will be using it for both soldering small pieces such as jump rings but would also like to solder larger pieces like bangles. Do I need two torches or is there one that would cover all of this? Is it worth spending the extra money to buy a proxxon (for the small pieces) and max flame or iroda pt500 (for larger pieces) or will a cheap cooks torch do the exact same job. Which torches do you recommend? Thank you
    Before you make any decision, read this:using-propane-gas-250913.pdf

    The smallest propane tank that I know you can use with any torch is 3.9Kg and even this tank is not recommended to be used indoors.

    See this guide: which-gas-bottle?

    I personally think your choice is limited by the fact that you are working inside your home.

    IMHO: You should stick with a small handheld butane torch because as you say, these are even sold as a Kitchen Blow Torch. I wouldn't consider anything bigger until you have a dedicated workshop outside of your home.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    2,068

    Default

    I thought that might be the case.
    The other option would be to have the bottle outside with a piped supply and switch off valve inside but probably a bit awkward if its an upstairs bedroom.
    Realistically I think if you are just starting out then get a handheld torch for now and accept its limitations.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Posts
    17

    Default

    I was worried these would be too much for a bedroom. In that case can anyone recommend the best micro torch that both gets the hottest (for thinner bangles as I think that's all id be limited to) but also a fine enough flame for smaller pieces?

    Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    cotswolds
    Posts
    3,362

    Default

    There is actually a good alternative that might work, and that's an orca (EZ Torch) with an adapter to allow you to use MAPP gas (which comes in much smaller bottles. I much prefer the orca to the sievert in terms of balance and air flow adjustability. It's more than enough for bangles and even small casting jobs and you can get a very nice small flame too. I have a little torch, but still tend to default to handheld or the EZ a lot of the time because of the sheer convenience and ease of use.

    https://www.bettsmetalsales.com/p-Ez-Torch-Kit/
    https://www.bettsmetalsales.com/p-Ez...ode=TOOLSSAGR8 - ask them to make it up with a suitable length of hose for your workspace

    this works with the 400g disposable MAPP cylinders, which are available at most plumbing and DIY stores (the yellow cannisters)

    The good thing is that if you move to a dedicated workspace, you can easily switch over to a large propane bottle using the original fittings for the torch.

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •