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Thread: All about platinol

  1. #1
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    Default All about platinol

    Here's my first go using platinol. Applied with a cotton bud, undiluted, then rinsed under a hot tap. I found with the copper parts it came out silvery which is a little bit of a shame as i prefer the brown you get with los, but it's a lot easier to use than los. I rubbed it back a bit with sandpaper. When i used a pro polish pad it made it more silvery.
    A few questions for everyone: if using diluted how much by? Can you keep it diluted in a container for a long time. Can you dip with stones attached such as fluorite and labradorite etc. Is there a way to make the copper come out less silvery? Should i use bicarb to neutralise? Is there no respiratory risk with platinol?

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    Last edited by Sheen; 15-03-2018 at 09:57 AM.

  2. #2
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    Second day of trying platinol. I discovered that the portion i had diluted the day before had gone clear in the morning and no longer worked so looks like it doesn't keep.
    I diluted the platinol with cold water a bit more today and was much more pleased with the results. I dipped them in platinol for a second or 3 and out into cold water. This gave me less of a silvery black and more of a brown toned copper. I had a few oops efforts which i will post soon.

  3. #3
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    Ps i've been using mizgeorge's description of using platinol at: http://www.cooksongold.com/forum/sho...?t=4598&page=2
    Last edited by Sheen; 16-03-2018 at 02:12 PM.

  4. #4
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    You have answered most of your questions yourself, Sheena:

    All our expectations are different and the only way to go is to experiment.

    My observations on your patination:
    There is some evidence of flaking, in view of the small darker patches. To me that says you need to slow the process down, by using it cold, more dilute and building up layers.

    If you want to take it back in a subtle way, then a polishing cloth, or plain lint free cotton cloth would be best. No need for sand paper.
    I also think it would be enhanced by waxing. There is no need to splash out on expensive products. any household wax polish used sparingly will do, even from a spray can and finished with soft toothbrush (for the grooves) and a cloth. Dennis.

  5. #5
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    The word 'experiment' sends shivers down my spine. I'm terrible for wanting a set of detailed instructions for anything I do (my brother's the same) but i'll try my best dennis. You were right about the flaking, i used it neat on my first attempts. Will try a polishing cloth for a couple of the rings i've done. Once you've oxidised something then it's a question of how much to remove. Decision, decisions. I do happen to have some renaissance wax.☺ i'll keep posting my efforts as think it might be useful for other beginners.

  6. #6
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    Here's a few of my efforts. 1st picture: ring on left dipped twice, ring on right dipped 3 times (gone shiny black)
    2nd picture light patch i think caused by not being clean enough. 3rd picture accidently used non tarnish copper wire for main hoop.
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    Last edited by Sheen; 16-03-2018 at 05:44 PM.

  7. #7
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    I think everyone has different ways of working with platinol that they like, I've just painted it undiluted a whole pendant taking a toothpick into the edges that I don't want oxidised. I then rinsed in hot water and brought it to shine with a duster.
    I've never oxidised earwires, I'm not sure I'd be happy even after neutralising. Loving the fishes especially the curls in the wires

  8. #8
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    Thanks caroline, i read a lot at one point about whether you should or shouldn't oxidise earwires. The general opinion seemed to be that you should at least remove the oxidation from where the earring sits. Which i'll do as you've reminded me. I have a feeling that perhaps it's not gonna flake as easily on silver as it does on copper (that's me guessing). I take it you mean that you scrape the platinol off the areas you want silver with a toothpick?

  9. #9
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    I don't oxidise wire at all, anything on bare skin. Even on pendants I usually leave the back with a matt clean finish.
    No I paint the neat platinol on with a pared down cotton bud and use a wooden toothpick to do the edges like you'd block in painting a wall. I can't say I've had flaking but I duster mine back to a darkish gunmetal grey most of the time then I'll wax it to enhance.
    I know you hate the word experiment but it really is just trial and error till you get the effect you want. Sometimes for a reason unbeknown to me I've had it not work at all doing all my usual stuff. I have had flaking on copper fold form come to think of it and it's been copper that I've had the problems with but as I don't use it for jewellery it's not so important. One of my serendipity pieces, I've stopped fretting about the small stuff and have to go with the flow

  10. #10
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    I'll have to take a leaf out of your book, i tend to obsess and overfocus on things i noticed when i was microtorching copper that it oxidises and flakes really easily. Most of the copper stuff i'm doing has been gathering dust for some time, but it's great to have a pile of things to platinol and learn. Some of the better pieces i'll make up in silver and try too. Hadn't thought about pendant backs, will remember that.

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