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Thread: Liver of sulphur after dipping

  1. #1
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    Default Liver of sulphur after dipping

    Just about to start using my gel liver of sulphur to oxidise loads of copper earrings and rings I've made. I've been reading a lot about it and am interested to know if using a neutralising bath of baking soda after liver of sulphur is necessary. Some people just seen to rinse their stuff under the tap without this step. What do you think?

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    Residues of pickling salts, or patinating agents might affect the wearer, so it is an additional safety measure. Once you get sensitive to something you come out in blisters, particularly around a piercing and it is with you for life.

    A large pinch of soda crystals from the supermarket is much cheaper than baking soda, but also needs a final rinse. Dennis.

  3. #3
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    Thanks dennis, i didn't want to be doing it, unless it was really necessary. Will make the effort. ps the book you recommended arrived this moving, a brief look through and i've already learnt things i wanted to know.

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    Thank you for your feed back Sheena. I do worry sometimes that I am misreading the person, but I thought it would be right for you. Dennis.

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    I don't neutralise my oxidisation but I use copious amounts of neat washing up liquid and I usually clean off all the residual stuff with a duster before in the final stages using Renaissance wax to enhance the colour. I use platinol as I can't tolerate FOS even if I use it outside. I recently bought in to a purchase of German black which is apparently the liquid of choice at ECA but being a creature of habit I haven't tried it yet as I can't read German!

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    Hi caroline that's useful to know. Funnily enough i bought some renaissance wax which i do use but do find the fumes a bit hard to stand. In regards to los i might be okay as it's a natural smell, it's air fresheners, perfumes, petrols, white spirits, etc that make me feel particularly yuck. I was wondering if platinol is easier to use than los, and what the health risks are?

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    Los may be a natural smell although rotten eggs isn't my favourite:/ but don't be fooled, that's why cookson only deliver by courier. The last time I tried to use it inside I nearly passed out, I just find it really toxic. I don't know about platinol, just that I find it smells less until you wash it off and touch wood it doesn't seem to bother me but it's a small bottle compared to los.i use it neat on a cotton bud or wooden toothpick for small areas. I'm loathe to see what the new stuff smells like which is why I've put it off, it's been a particularly bad winter and I don't want things to get worse so near to the OS.
    I know the renaissance wax is bit smelly but as soon as it dries and you polish it up I haven't found any residual odour.
    Last edited by CJ57; 17-02-2018 at 06:20 PM.

  8. #8
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    I found that with the wax too. Once it's set and left overnight it's fine. i like the idea that you can use platinol neat so no mixing sticks and hot water required.

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    You'll get differing views on using it neat so you'll just have to try it. If I just want to use it in a definite area and not submerge the whole thing then I use it neat

  10. #10
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    The rotten egg smell when using liver of sulphur solution is due to the liberation of hydrogen sulphide, a highly toxic and flammable gas.

    It is heavier than air and therefore will linger at floor level unless there is forced ventilation. The rapid fatigue of nasal receptors means that it is no longer detected after quite a short period.

    I have no idea why it is so popular, except for its cheapness.

    The proprietary solutions such as Platinol and Noirit hardly smell at all, but are caustic to skin and hair, so you need to haver eye protection, wear gloves and use synthetic brushes.

    Experiments will show you whether to use it diluted, and whether to use it cold or warm. We all have our own favourite ways. If diluted it will only work for a short time, but in my opinion a slow process using a dilute solution in cold water gives a more durable patina. Dennis.

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