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Thread: Liver of sulphur after dipping

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis View Post
    Ha ha, that explains it better. Nancy Hamilton is a force of nature, but I wouldn't have her living in. Dennis.
    Nancy's one of my favourites

  2. #32
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  3. #33
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    Mar 2018
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    Evening,

    I'm a new member and I hope it will be ok if I join in your conversation?

    I have Noirit Black Oxidation Solution and was wondering if there is some way of masking/stopping it on either matt finish or polished silver jewellery? The Noirit is hard to control as hard as the LoS used to be. It tends to bleed out over a sheet metal surface especially when curved. Do you know of any magic tape or wax/sealant that I could use?
    Apologies if this isn't the way to do things.
    Regards CeeBee

  4. #34
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    No, but even if it were possible to print on a flat surface, the effect would soon be overtaken by the natural darkening of the clear areas.

    The only way to fence in the blackening agent is to etch, or stamp a recess, so that any excess can be polished away. For lettering, you can just colour in with a fine Sharpie.
    In use the clear areas are then maintained by handling and wear, while the recesses remain dark. Dennis.

  5. #35
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    Mar 2018
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    Thank you, Dennis

    I like the sharpie suggestion and yes I am thinking of stamping a design. I'll just have to start the test pieces and stop worrying about it limiting my ideas. Its just I'm looking for a way to repeat a pattern and a process in a batch. I'm going to use my rolling mill to emboss designs. I have used base metal templates I pierced myself but was wondering again whether I need to use sheet steel as my pattern cutters for stability? If I use ordinary fine saw blades with steel will they blunt? I can't remember what sort of steel or whether I should harden it? 1995 was a long time ago!

    regards CeeBee
    Last edited by CeeBee; 08-03-2018 at 10:21 PM. Reason: typos!

  6. #36
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    It's OK to cut steel provided you lubricate your blades. if you need many copies, look at the RT Blanking system.

    You don't need all the fancy equipment for sawing, as the angles are easily judged by eye, but you need some kind of press.
    Alternatively you can have repeat patterns laser cut, or if thin by an etching company, who can etch right through. Dennis.

  7. #37
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    Most of the time I pierce steel with no lubricant - the only time I find I really need it is when I inadvertently change angles fractionally and cause the saw to bind. I often use platinum saw blades for steel, but they tend to be more sensitive to breaking if they bind, although they blunt far less readily.

    Piercing thick steel is where you really see the effects of a blunt sawblade's tracking being awry.

  8. #38
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    Mar 2018
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    Hello Dennis,
    Is the RT Blanking system the one that Ann Marie Shilito uses, I went to see her when I was a student, i will look it up. Thanks again. Regards CeeBee

  9. #39
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    Mar 2018
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    Thank you, this all helps, i'll note it down in my sketch book next to my test pieces . I'll post some pics if I manage to use the steel patterns again with my mini rolling mill.

    regards CeeBee

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