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Thread: Copper solder?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sheen View Post
    Any way to harden up shaped (3d) copper elements after soldering? Or is it best to not to solder them in the first place? Had noticed some of my items were very bendy. Definitely going to try easy solder and see if it helps.
    No, copper is extremely soft once annealed. If you can't harden it by forging, or twisting, you can try just using a thicker gauge and as you say an extra easy solder. Dennis

  2. #12
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    Thanks Dennis

  3. #13
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    I regularly solder copper with silver solder and as enigma has said its good practice to ensure you have a tight join. I've tried copper solder, but have gone back to using silver.
    Jules

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis View Post
    No, copper is extremely soft once annealed. If you can't harden it by forging, or twisting, you can try just using a thicker gauge and as you say an extra easy solder. Dennis
    Hi Dennis, tried just using easy solder on some stud earrings this morning, definitly seems to have worked. Lot less squishy. Thanks

  5. #15
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    If you are continuing to work with copper Sheena, you might also get silver extra easy solder. It will turn your life around and it is quite inexpensive. Dennis

  6. #16
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    I always thought you were supposed to avoid extra easy silver solder? All the books tell you not to use it

  7. #17
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    Extra easy solder is actually accepted for hall making. Its uses can vary from repairing an item of uncertain composition, adding something to an item that is already very large and would otherwise be endangered by excessive heating, and use on base metals.

    Its downside is that it is a little grey on silver pieces and is said to be not as strong as the harder grades. That said, I have never had it break, and have used it to solder a detached stainless steel rung on an oven shelf, three or four years ago, which is still intact. Dennis.

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