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Thread: Dremel 4000 worth buying?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
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    Default Dremel 4000 worth buying?

    Hi all, I knew I wouldn't be able to stay away during this festive season. I somehow wandered into looking at drills for sale. I saw a Dremel 4000 with Flexi shaft at a very tasty price(abt 60). I would use it to drill holes, maybe sink rivets and etching, initially. Is this worth buying, or would I be better of keeping my money for some time in the future when I could buy a proxxon and a Flexi shaft at a higher price. I currently have a Archimedes drill. I love buying equipment but get overwhelmed by too much stuff, a contradiction I know, but surely I wouldn't regret it? Best festive wishes to you all

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Central London
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    The best answer is to save up for a Foredom, which is the moderately priced workhorse for many of our members:

    https://www.bettsmetalsales.com/p-Fo...ant-Motor/2803

    If you are impatient, then I woukd skip the ones you mentioned, and go for a cheap Marathon from China, or avoid hidden extras like duty and handling charges by going to a Chinese company in uk, for something like this:

    http://www.dentalplaza.co.uk/Maratho...16-dental.html.

    Even for drillig holes you need a slow controlled sped. Micromotors are small and elegant to use. Dennis.

  3. #3
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    Nov 2017
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    Thanks Dennis, this is exactly the answer I was looking for. A micro motor seems like a much more elegant solution to drilling a hole, less bulk, less bits and I read that there is also less vibration. Will be putting these two options on my list, though I may go for the cheaper one as I could put it in and out of my cupboard with ease. Thanks again

  4. #4
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    Yes, the foredom is a pendant motor and requires a rod with a hook to hang it up, so putting it away is not that simple.

    My Marathon micromotor, goes in a little bag when I take it to classes once a week. I bought it from China via Amazon and was not hit with duty or VAT, sometimes you can be, but the carrier required a handling charge of 16.

    It's still going well after more than two years. The torque is adequate at quite low speeds required for drilling and I don't even bother with the foot switch, as it can be switched manually. Dennis.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Marathon Micromotor.jpg  

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
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    I agree with Dennis, Dremels are pretty useless.
    The only thing for me on pendant versus micro motor is that I think the hammer handpieces are really expensive on micromotors and I use mine a lot.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    Your are right Sarah. I was given my Foredom micromotor as a Xmas present and I really needed the hammer action handpiece but it was the same price again 400 at least. I don't know if can justify that for the little stone setting I do but I could have done with it recently. It is really neat though and can be moved anywhere with ease. I think it was Mark who suggested the dremel engraver as having the same action and adequate for the job if not using all the time

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
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    Been having a browse of marathon micro motors does it make any differance if it is 35,000rpm or 40,000rpm? Anything else i should look out for?

  8. #8
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    No, you only use about a quarter of the speed with metal, or you strip your drills. Mine is 35,000rpm.

    Make sure you are buying the control box, the handpiece (which contains the motor) and an optional foot swich if you want one. Without the foot switch you can still switch on manually and turn the speed dial. Some models have a footswitch which also acts as a speed control, but that requires a whole new set of reflexes.

    There is also an error tone (a screaming noise) when you do something wrong such as running it with the chuck open, or pressing too hard. This prompts you to stop the machine and press the re-set button. Only happens occasionally if you get absent minded.

    Obviously there is a degree of risk involved, so buy through a company based in UK. This also ensures you get one suitable for UK voltage and a UK plug. If you don't like risk, don't take up this suggestion, but buy a dearer machine from a UK jewellry supplies company.

    But please let us know how you get on. Dennis.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    If you are used to using a sewing machine then the foot control will be no problem but I used the dial more often as I can reach the floor from my stool beside the polisher!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
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    For the money i think the risk is negligible do these machines take very small drill bits. I have 0.4mm drill bit. I take it with engraving you use burrs? What sort of speed would you run the machine at for engraving? Found these two machines on the internet at the lowest prices. Any differance between the two? https://m.ebay.co.uk/itm/Dental-Lab-...kAAOSw1LNZ3b~Y

    https://m.ebay.co.uk/itm/Dental-Lab-...QAAOSw9KhaOgS6

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