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Thread: Pickle after annealing?

  1. #11
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    Dec 2014
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    My day has not been wasted I learnt some thing new "Pepper on Strawberries"

  2. #12
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    Aug 2017
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    So, after annealing I mix the metal in a fruit salad with no tomato, add pepper and strawberries. It all makes sense now!

  3. #13
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    Assuming you've got citrus fruits in your fruit salad, it should pickle well.
    I suspect pineapple would work well as a pickle - it eats pretty much anything with the aggressive mix of enzymes & citric acid.

  4. #14
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    Nov 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by ps_bond View Post
    Assuming you've got citrus fruits in your fruit salad, it should pickle well.
    I suspect pineapple would work well as a pickle - it eats pretty much anything with the aggressive mix of enzymes & citric acid.
    I might seriously try the pineapple☺ I work in my living room/kitchen (don't want to turn my place into a workshop), Worcester sauce might also work, that's good for cleaning brass.

  5. #15
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    Alum is really OK, as it is used in some Asian recipes, but it needs to be hand hot. It gives a beautiful clean finish.
    Some members have used acetic acid as in brewed malt vinegar, but the smell is very strong.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis View Post
    Alum is really OK, as it is used in some Asian recipes, but it needs to be hand hot. It gives a beautiful clean finish.
    Some members have used acetic acid as in brewed malt vinegar, but the smell is very strong.
    Having spent years trying to get our chemist to find alum to no avail I was amazed that it comes under foodstuffs on Amazon and you can buy it by the bucketload. A wee slow cooker for £20 is also really useful for your pickle Sheen

  7. #17
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    Aug 2017
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    I prefer using nasty nasty chemicals that are hazardous to all biological lifeforms, it feels more like Silversmithing and less like cooking.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by handmadeblanks View Post
    I prefer using nasty nasty chemicals that are hazardous to all biological lifeforms, it feels more like Silversmithing and less like cooking.
    Bad Boy. Sit!

  9. #19
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    Nov 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by handmadeblanks View Post
    I prefer using nasty nasty chemicals that are hazardous to all biological lifeforms, it feels more like Silversmithing and less like cooking.
    What about the dolphins?

  10. #20
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    Jul 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis View Post
    Some members have used acetic acid as in brewed malt vinegar, but the smell is very strong.
    I use a vinegar and salt mix for pickle, usually white or cider vinegar. Luckily my sense of smell is immune to it! My kids complain about the smell, but recently one of my step-daughters visited and said, "Oh, something smells good. What are you cooking?"
    The downside is that I've gotten into the habit of picking things out of the pot with my fingers so I have to be very careful when I'm in class that I don't do so there.

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