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Thread: Jewellery making newbie

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
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    232

    Smile Jewellery making newbie

    Hi Everyone,

    I am a relative newbie to the jewellery making craft even though I have been interested in precious metals (gold & silver) for a very long time.

    To cut a long story short: My journey began in December 2016 when, after another round of redundancies at work, my job didnít feel as secure as it once did. I felt the need to have a skill that I could develop first via a hobby but would also provide an income if the need ever arose. Just before Christmas I purchased an Artisan disc cutter set and brass sheet and stamped my first jewellery charms and I have been utterly hooked ever since!

    I have been reading books and online technical journals on Silversmithing. I joined an online training course and did a one day private tuition at the London jeweller school. I have also converted half of my garage into a dedicated jewellery making workshop.

    I am not creative in any way and donít pretend to be. My main qualification is in electronics (maintenance technician) and my approach to this craft is mostly technical and that is what I really enjoy about it. The tools available today allow someone like me to produce items that (hopefully) are good enough to sell. N.B: I have yet to sell my first item, so maybe this is all just a pipe dream.

    I sometimes feel like I am a bit of a Ďhackí especially when I read and hear people talk about how passionate they are about jewellery making and how they have been doing it since they were very young. But believe me, I am passionate and meticulous about the craft, I just donít possess creative talent. Maybe it will develop over timeÖ?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Central London
    Posts
    8,254

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    Don't despair, there is room here for any approach you may have to jewellery making. If your satisfaction is in being a meticulous crafts person, then you can find your pleasure in that and study the basics:

    How to make a ring, a brooch, ear studs, a pendant, a bangle etc
    Also in techniques, such as fold forming, forging, engraving, Chasing and repoussť, or even CADCAM and casting.

    For inspiration You can adapt traditional designs, or plants and animals, by browsing online.

    Ideally you will go to a part time class to absorb a feeling for the subject. Dennis.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    22

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    I was computer geek a few years ago, living in an office and only knowledgable about computers. No friends or relatives having bussiness related with jewelry.

    It is a long and hard way, but you will get it

    Determination, working hard, learning from lots of errors ... Creativity helps, but is not so much important.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Scotland
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    It depends what you need from making jewellery. Being technical is a big part and if you have the attention to detail then you are on your way to creating something someone will want to buy. You maybe need to broaden your outlook when you are out and about even in the city. We were made to draw natural form or taken to the museum to draw machines in motion. It does make you look at everything you see much differently and with a new eye. Even taking loads of photos of interesting things might throw up a shape or form that will lead to a design

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
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    2,068

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    If you have the technical skills but lack creativity you may find that a good way to proceed is working with friends and relatives designs and then onto commissions.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Birmingham
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    I can totally relate where you are coming from, i will say that in my journey towards perfection...Youtube has been and continues to be my bestfriend. There are some pretty amaizing channels on it. If you want, i would be more than happy to recommend some to you.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Romsey
    Posts
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    The fact that you're making jewellery shows you've got more creativity than you think you have, it's just a question of nurturing it. Draw. Lots. Play with bits of metal (copper is cheap enough for mockups, especially if you can use scavenged stuff).

    Did you do much board-level rework under a scope? That gives ideal transferable skills for setting (and other fiddly work). "Wrong" sort of soldering (no, I don't know why we persist in calling brazing soldering) obviously, but the developed hand/eye coordination is extremely useful.

    A technical bias leads in naturally to developing a deeper understanding of materials properties than is taught in jewellery courses and - as Dennis says - CAD might be something that works for you.

    Don't believe that not having an explicit art background puts you at a disadvantage

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
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    2

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    If you have good technical skills. Creativity is not that hard task for you to learn. Creativity work is something that comes from you and for this all you need to do is to do some works that will help you to increase your creativity skills as well.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    cotswolds
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kenneth J. Young View Post
    If you have good technical skills. Creativity is not that hard task for you to learn. Creativity work is something that comes from you and for this all you need to do is to do some works that will help you to increase your creativity skills as well.
    Utter gibberish

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Romsey
    Posts
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    Already watching.

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