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Thread: Flush Setting

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
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    Default Flush Setting

    Hi all

    Having just finished a few jobs for my friends, I need a new project!

    I'd like to try flush setting next and have a question about the wee burnishers you need to make.

    I'm using these tutorials mainly as well as my books:
    http://www.professionaljeweler.com/a.../0200fys1.html
    http://www.cooksongold.com/forum/sho...=flush+setting
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=1RVZvn...ature=youtu.be

    Most talk about refashioning burrs or grain tools to create a rounded polished end, but in the last link, the video by John, he also shows a little flat faced pusher, which appears to be used first. I can't quite figure out if I need one of them tho, or what it's for?

    I was planning to use 0.5mm burrs to make both a polished round ended tapered tool and a really sharp pointed tool. Does that sound like a good start, or would folks recommend making the flat one or others too?

    Many thanks as always

    Faith

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    Central London
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    Default

    Hi Faith,
    Flush setting is not that difficult if you use the following general rules:

    1.Make sure that you can see well, by using magnification. Even with a head band magnifier, my eyes won't cope with anything smaller than 1.5mm stones.

    Match the seat as exactly as possible to the stone and make sure that the table is about level with the surface. Slightly above it for larger stones.

    Use a burnisher with a heavy handle, so that you can press with less effort. Make it by breaking off the head of a burr appropriate to the size of stone, although the necks aren't all that different.

    Practice with copper and cheap CZs. Dennis.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
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    Default

    Thanks Dennis,

    1.5mm stones were what I was planning to try with. Magnifying headband is a definite as are the cheap CZs.

    I'm just struggling to invisage how big or small I need to make the nose of the pusher, but I guess for a 1.5 stone it needs to be really quite tiny...

    Faith

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Manchester UK
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    Default

    You need to be able to get the tip of the burnisher between the girdle of the stone and the top of the metal if you get the old burr shaft in your handpeice spin it up then quickly rub it against a part of a diamond sharpening block you dont use normally. You will be able to shape it pretty quickly and keep trying it until it fits nicely, try not to go to sharp it needs a rounded end ideally. Also try to get a nice polish on it this will be transfered to the metal it touches
    Last edited by josef1; 04-04-2017 at 10:52 PM.

  5. #5
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    Central London
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    Unforeseen problems can arise with very curved surfaces such as rectangular, D shaped and oval wires used in ring shanks. If the stone size is on the big side, the girdle can't be completely covered unless the stone is set very deeply, leading to an unsightly effect.

    Burnishing also becomes more difficult, unless you have a hammer handpiece. An inexpensive remedy first suggested by Aurarius (Mark), is to use a polished Dremel engraver tool at a low setting. As they offer replacement tips, other tips can be fashioned, or used in reverse for bezel setting too. Dennis.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
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    Default

    Thanks Josef, I think I can see that in my head, they're be a little gap between the crown facets and the metal and it needs to be able to get in there.

    Thanks Dennis too, I'm going to start setting into flat sheet to learn, although it occurred to me that maybe the problem you mention with curved surfaces is why "John" in the utube link above uses a flat pusher first, perhaps its to even out the edge of the drilled hole before setting...?

    Many thanks,
    Faith

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
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    Default

    Ooo I just had a thought... if flush setting into silver sheet, would you usually go for sterling or fine?

    I had been thinking sterling, just as that's what I'd normally buy, but would the softer fine make the setting easier?

    Many thanks
    Faith

  8. #8
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    Sterling would be more realistic, but why not use copper? Even a piece of copper pipe could be fun, but not one with mains water. Dennis.

  9. #9
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    Jul 2014
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    Default

    Tee hee, bling plumbing!

    But no I meant for after initial practice I want to make some earrings as a flush setting project, constructed from thickish (1.5mm maybe) silver disks with a bezel set stone in the middle and kind of flush set halo. Even if they're not perfect I end up rather attached to my practice projects and would want to wear them, so I'll use silver. I just wasn't sure if folks often prefer fine silver for flush setting, like for bezel walls, or sterling for the extra strength?

    Ta
    Faith

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Manchester UK
    Posts
    760

    Default

    Sterling will be fine

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