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Thread: Removing Efcolor Enamel

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
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    Default Removing Efcolor Enamel

    Hi,
    has anybody any experience with removing the above...
    Regards
    Mark

  2. #2
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    Dec 2009
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    No, but as the data sheet says it's an epoxy resin, it should burn off with a torch.
    Use a soft bushy flame and work in subdued light, so that you can see where the flame is being directed. Go on until any carbon residue has burnt off. Dennis.

  3. #3
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    I have no experience with that type of enamel, but if it is an epoxy resin then you may be able to dissolve it by soaking it in Nitromors paint stripper for a few hours or longer.

    James

  4. #4
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    Jun 2016
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    Thanks Dennis and James for your thought's, i will give both methods a try....
    It's horrible stuff....
    Mark

  5. #5
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    Jul 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mark1964 View Post
    Thanks Dennis and James for your thought's, i will give both methods a try....
    It's horrible stuff....
    Mark
    You've got me curious now - Why is it horrible stuff? Just to remove, or horrible in another way?

  6. #6
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    I guess because it's a craft product with rather garish colours. The real enamel can be much more gemstone like. Dennis.

  7. #7
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    I'd quite like to try adding some colour and was thinking of trying the Efcolor. I can't afford (and don't have space for) a kiln at the moment, so thought using a resin enamel might be worth a shot.

    Does anyone know how hardwearing it would be?

  8. #8
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    Jul 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis View Post
    I guess because it's a craft product with rather garish colours. The real enamel can be much more gemstone like. Dennis.
    Thank you Dennis. They look rather interesting - and a lot easier than firing up my beastie of a kiln, but it's quite to work out exactly what they are.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
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    Hi Lucie,
    It's a great product for adding a bit of colour don't be put off giving them a go.
    The colour range is ok, very modern and of course all you need is a conventional oven to cure them.
    If your using copper the 150 degree heat means you experience no fire scale which is a real bonus.
    They work well with a single application layer, and you can easily blend the colour's.

    What you cannot do is re-fire them like standard enamels, they are a kind of "fire once" and forget product so no sanding and re-firing
    I have managed to wet pack them by adding a small amounts of Klyr Fire, my advice would to be remove excess moisture by the "paper towel" method.
    As I found just leaving them to dry naturally left air pockets which showed up as holes when cured.
    Hope you have fun
    Mark

  10. #10
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    Mar 2013
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    Lauren, have you tried simple torch fired enameling?

    I've started to incorporate it into some pieces I've made recently and its perfectly doable with a torch, no kiln required. The last photo I posted in 'Show And Tell' is a recent example.

    Thats just reminded me that I need to buy a kiln as I keep on using the kitchen oven for Argentium finishing which isnt ideal!

    Nick

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