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Thread: Any engravers?

  1. #11
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    Thank you, Goldsmith. Your work is absolutely splendid, by the way. Really.

  2. #12
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    Hi Bob - according to my cheatsheet, a #50 round graver is 0.2mm across (AKA #2). What help do you need with grinding them? I did think that Cogswell's instructions were pretty good, but these things are mebbe a bit daunting the first time round.

    I've mixed feelings about trying to learn engraving from a book - yes, once you've got sharpening the tool down & the basic movements a lot of the detail in e.g. Art of Engraving or the Jewelry Engraver's Manual make a lot more sense, but having the immediate feedback in tuition is very, very useful. YMMV, of course.

    The air assisted tools are a very different kettle of fish - although once I'd used my Airgraver for a while I found that my use of the hand-pushed was much improved; it's all the same movement after all, and the angle of attack on the graver is the same for a given sharpening angle & material... They're an expensive luxury for the likes of me though; a different matter for someone doing it full-time.

  3. #13
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    My problem is not having the equipment to grind them! Thanks for the info, Peter.

    I actually only want to make some false channel settings and stitch the back of them to secure the stones, as explained in Cogswell's book - my bible. In any case, my college course starts soon, so I will make the settings and then ask my tutor if I can borrow an engraver for a day or so.

  4. #14
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    Strangely, I have - I can do them for you if you need - but you will need a decent sharpening stone to keep the tool sharp.

  5. #15
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    Oh, that is very, very kind of you, thank you so much. I need to order some more silver today so I will order a graver and then be in touch again. My father has sharpening stones so I can keep them sharp easily enough. Thanks again.

    Do you think this is the sort of thing I should be getting? http://www.suttontools.co.uk/acatalog/info_GR182.html It's half round, they don't do round ones that small.
    Last edited by bob flemming; 02-09-2010 at 12:42 PM.

  6. #16
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    Ah... That's perhaps less useful to you; that's a short-shank graver specifically for fitting to pneumatic handpieces. You *can* get a graver handle that fits them, but you'd probably be better off with a Vallorbe graver (I don't feel HSS is needed for what you're describing - it's more work to sharpen). You'll need a suitable wooden handle too; style is down to personal preference only - I tend to like the mushroom/flat ones, but use pretty much whatever I have on hand at the time.

    As for the stones, something like a Norton fine stone is good for general sharpening, you'll need something finer for polishing - #4 polishing paper works well, but so do the very fine grades of wet & dry (1200-2400). I usually go from ceramic to a piece of manilla card coated in Dialux Green for polishing my gravers; there are cheaper solutions than buying ceramic stones though.

  7. #17
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    Ah OK, how about http://www.suttontools.co.uk/acatalo...lorbe_162.html specifically Sutton Tools Round Edge

    No problem with the sharpening, I think I have that covered with what I already have.
    Last edited by bob flemming; 02-09-2010 at 01:21 PM.

  8. #18
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  9. #19
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    The spitzstick - AKA onglette - is more of a curved knife edge; great for fine, deep cuts with the point or using the edge to cut away metal in carving (or bright cutting even), but it's a bit too pointy to use to raise beads IMO. I can see round-edge scorpers on Cookson's site, but not quite at the 0.2mm level - finest I can see is 0.4.

    The Sutton one is spot on.

    And yes, I do flick back and forth between calling them gravers and scorpers

  10. #20
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    Thanks again for taking the time to be so helpful. I'll order the Sutton one.

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