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Thread: Hallmarking Queries

  1. #81
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Posts
    669

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ceri View Post
    I bought in Malta in 2002 which are marked 9kt but they are plate.
    Of course you'll know that the 9kt mark isn't necessarily a hallmark, but a stamp that can be bought by anyone. I have a couple of gold kt stamps and a '925' and apply them (in fact I've only ever used '925') as appropriate. Only the assay office can apply the hallmark, hence the reason it does act as a guarantee. For a stamped, plated article, yes, it would be misleading to knowingly mark a plated article and potentially a case fraud / deception to sell it knowingly.

  2. #82
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Bathinda, India, India
    Posts
    117

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    Quote Originally Posted by CJ57 View Post
    My assay office Edinburgh, doesn't mark plated metal and they do indeed test every piece that is sent in Jasdir
    Caroline, My question is..

    Considering.. Archimedes-principle cannot be applied on the pieces/articles that carry studded stones etc. because different stones have different densities. XRF cannot test the ready article/piece down to core unless it is melted.

    What is the method applied for testing purity of a finished article/piece ? or assay office just do it by mere guess ?
    Jewelry for today's world,
    Whereby, style following the pattern of traditional world !

  3. #83
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    2,458

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jasdir Singh Jaura View Post
    Caroline, My question is..

    Considering.. Archimedes-principle cannot be applied on the pieces/articles that carry studded stones etc. because different stones have different densities. XRF cannot test the ready article/piece down to core unless it is melted.

    What is the method applied for testing purity of a finished article/piece ? or assay office just do it by mere guess ?
    I don't work there so don't know their processes so it would be best to phone one of them and put their question as no one from the assay office seems to look in on the forum anymore. I think we have all suggested everything we can with our limited knowledge which doesn't seem to answer your question. I found this on the Edinburgh website

    Before your goods can be hallmarked they must first of all be tested to ensure they are of the standard submitted.

    Where it is not possible to remove a sample of metal for testing we are able to test using X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (XRF). This method is ideal for finished gold, silver and platinum pieces and does not require the removal of any material.

    Sometimes in order to test your goods we must first remove a sample of metal. The amount of sample removed is normally less than 100 milligrams (one tenth of a gram). However, our fully trained and equipped jewellery finishing service ensures your products are returned in perfect order.

    Any sample physically removed is analysed by our in house 17025 laboratory using cupellation (fire assay) for gold, potentiometric titration for silver, or X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (XRF) for platinum and palladium.
    Last edited by CJ57; 02-06-2016 at 11:44 AM.

  4. #84
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    Bathinda, India, India
    Posts
    117

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    Quote Originally Posted by CJ57 View Post
    I don't work there so don't know their processes so it would be best to phone one of them and put their question as no one from the assay office seems to look in on the forum anymore.
    Oh! Okay


    I think we have all suggested everything we can with our limited knowledge which doesn't seem to answer your question. I found this on the Edinburgh website

    Before your goods can be hallmarked they must first of all be tested to ensure they are of the standard submitted.

    Where it is not possible to remove a sample of metal for testing we are able to test using X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (XRF). This method is ideal for finished gold, silver and platinum pieces and does not require the removal of any material.

    Sometimes in order to test your goods we must first remove a sample of metal. The amount of sample removed is normally less than 100 milligrams (one tenth of a gram). However, our fully trained and equipped jewellery finishing service ensures your products are returned in perfect order.

    Any sample physically removed is analysed by our in house 17025 laboratory using cupellation (fire assay) for gold, potentiometric titration for silver, or X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy (XRF) for platinum and palladium.
    Caroline, I don't doubt hallmarking "Standards". In fact it is very good to maintain "Standards", I admire.

    The above copy-paste doesn't answer my question, Yes, you are right, it would be best to phone one of them.

    However, thanks for your efforts.

    ..Jasdir
    Jewelry for today's world,
    Whereby, style following the pattern of traditional world !

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