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Thread: Americans

  1. #11
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    Btw I pronounce it "sodder" as well. As hard as I try pronouncing the L in solder - it just doesn't feel right LOL. There are many words with the silent "L", like could, would, should, talk, walk, just for starters. And don't get me started on words like Worcestershire and Leicestershire!
    Last edited by Sandra; 18-10-2015 at 09:21 PM.

  2. #12
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    I pronounce it 'sodder' as well (Canadian). That's just the way I've always heard it said. Only one person I know pronounces it "solder" which sounds bizarre to me. We've kept a lot of language related things from the British (colour vs color etc) but solder didn't survive the trip across the sea I guess. At least not where I am.
    - Emily

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by emsterv View Post
    We've kept a lot of language related things from the British (colour vs color etc) but solder didn't survive the trip across the sea I guess. At least not where I am.
    But it may be the case that it is a survival, as Peter suggests, and Br. English ˈsəʊldə represents a shift.

  4. #14
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    I am approaching the age of 70, so am I older than most on this forum or am I odder?

    When I was young I am sure that soddering was illegal.

    James
    Last edited by Goldsmith; 19-10-2015 at 07:27 AM.

  5. #15
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    "Sodder"! Wllbloddyell wassthasallonabaht? Ifiss drift yerluckinfor sthemyanksforshaw. Themmort contintents anyroad. Welladdworktutfouto'rarstairs!! Issolder in Yorkshire. Nobbut... gerritreet ...

  6. #16
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    Reminds me of when my Canadian cousin visited some years ago - she couldn't understand what I was talking about when I mentioned I'd seen a squirrel in the garden. Eventually she understood but said "oh, you mean a skwerl" (phonetic spelling obvs!).


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis View Post
    But I presume you pronounce the 'll', in Shelley?
    Haha! Of course I do! I was just taught not to pronounce the L in Soldering even before I new how to spell soldering. When I found out how it is spelled I thought it was stupid but just chalked it up to another of the English languages quirks.

    Rock Shelley
    www.rockshelley.com

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockshelley View Post
    Haha! Of course I do! I was just taught not to pronounce the L in Soldering even before I new how to spell soldering. When I found out how it is spelled I thought it was stupid but just chalked it up to another of the English languages quirks.

    Rock Shelley
    www.rockshelley.com
    Which brings us back to the fact that both countries may be English speaking but there the similarity ends it's really just the word sold with an er on the end which if you live in certain parts of Scotland then becomes more of an errr!

  9. #19
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    Speaking of pronunciations of "er" in the above comment - when and why do you suppose that the letter "r" became silent in England's English, yet in Ireland and Scotland it is still pronounced? And in the USA of course, unless you are from certain parts of the east coast where you can still hear the old English accent.
    Last edited by Sandra; 19-10-2015 at 04:19 PM.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sandra View Post
    Speaking of pronunciations of "er" in the above comment - when and why do you suppose that the letter "r" became silent in England's English, yet in Ireland and Scotland it is still pronounced? And in the USA of course, unless you are from certain parts of the east coast where you can still hear the old English accent.
    Weakening and consequent loss of post-vocalic "r" can probably be dated to before the 15th century. This sort of thing usually happens because the pronunciation is found to be quicker/easier. If the new pronunciation can claim some prestige as well (and non-rhotic varieties of Br. English rightly or wrongly have, or at least had, this prestige) then it is likely to gain acceptance all the more quickly.

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