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Thread: Soldering bezel to reticulated surface

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    Default Soldering bezel to reticulated surface

    I'm just about to attept this for the first time. Thing is..how do I solder the bezel to an uneven surface?
    Any tips appreciated
    .

  2. #2
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    Dec 2009
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    There are two issues:
    1. To fix the made bezel to the back plate, make a mark on both with a waterproof marker. They don't interfere with soldering.
    Then carefully file or grind the bottom of the bezel to fit, replacing it at each try by matching up your marks. when you have the best possible fit, solder them together, placing the solder on the inside.

    Of course if your bezel is round and you have metal doming punches, you can more or less flatten an area on a steel block with the wrong end of a punch, hitting it with a hide mallet.

    2. If the inside is not level enough, you might have to grind it, or put in loose pieces from a large jump ring, to create a level seat. Dennis

  3. #3
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    Mar 2015
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis View Post
    There are two issues:
    1. To fix the made bezel to the back plate, make a mark on both with a waterproof marker. They don't interfere with soldering.
    Then carefully file or grind the bottom of the bezel to fit, replacing it at each try by matching up your marks. when you have the best possible fit, solder them together, placing the solder on the inside.

    Of course if your bezel is round and you have metal doming punches, you can more or less flatten an area on a steel block with the wrong end of a punch, hitting it with a hide mallet.

    2. If the inside is not level enough, you might have to grind it, or put in loose pieces from a large jump ring, to create a level seat. Dennis
    Thanks Dennis!
    Some brilliant tips for the future on this occasion a slightly larger piece of solder seemed to fll the gaps ok . I as surprised as there wasn't a lot of contact between the bee land the surface. I had to run. Little extra solder to fill one small gap but that was it.
    Planning more reticulation with bezels so will go with your tips next time.
    Thanks you

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
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    Northeast UK
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    I've found that soldering bezel strips to pieces cast in cuttlefish is sometimes possible, as long as the texture isn't too rough.

    During soldering, its almost as if the thin bezel wall is pulled down onto the main piece and blends in with it nicely, although you do have to be careful and concentrate the heat.

    Nick

  5. #5
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    Nov 2010
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    London
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis View Post

    Of course if your bezel is round and you have metal doming punches, you can more or less flatten an area on a steel block with the wrong end of a punch, hitting it with a hide mallet.
    This is a definite "why didn't I think of that " moment. Thanks Dennis!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
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    Stourbridge
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    Thanks for the question and the answers provided. I've been dabbling with reticulation and the very same question had crossed my mind. You beat me to it!
    Sue.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  7. #7
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    I am pleased that Caline has managed to solve this problem for herself. But without wishing to play down her success, solder used to fill gaps is not very strong and can give way during the setting process.

    As this is virtually at the end of construction, it is not a good time to see you work come apart. So I would still aim for good adaptation in the future. Dennis.

  8. #8
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    May 2014
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    Canada
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis View Post
    Of course if your bezel is round and you have metal doming punches, you can more or less flatten an area on a steel block with the wrong end of a punch, hitting it with a hide mallet.
    . Dennis
    Brilliant tip, Dennis!!
    - Emily

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
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    34

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    I'll be taking the tips on board for my next piece.
    Another questions regarding reticulation.....I have a micro torch at the moment which came included in cooksons solder kit. I'm finding it hard to get 1mm silver sheet hot enough to reticulate with this torch.
    In my class we use cans of butane with the torch attachment on top. They produce a bigger flame and heat faster. What would be a similar set up that I could use?
    Thank you

  10. #10
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    You can buy a DIY torch for home plumbing jobs. There are two: The Go-System and the Campingaz. Which one you buy depends on the nearest supplier of replacement canisters. Mine is the Campingaz.

    When first used, they tend to flare and splutter a bit, but that gets better when some of the gas has been used up.
    It is best to get the self igniting version.
    Also I have added an unauthorised copper strip to mine, Ω-shaped, which can close off the air a little to get a bushy less fierce flame when needed. But it can't be touched once hot.

    You also need fire precautions at home, Dennis.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Hand Held Torch Modified.jpg  
    Last edited by Dennis; 04-10-2015 at 10:14 PM.

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