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Thread: Sievert Blow Torch

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
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    Unhappy Sievert Blow Torch

    Hello everyone!

    I got a sievert torch about a year ago, and initially had some problems with it bursting into flames where the nozzle attaches. I sent it back to the company I bought it from to have it checked over. The problem was simply that the nozzle was not screwed on tight enough allowing gas to escape. The company very kindly tightened it up for me and I had no problems until now.....it has started bursting into flames again and I found the nozzle had loosened drastically. I am having trouble tightening it sufficiently, and just wonder what tool(s) anyone uses/would recommend for tightening the nozzle effectively? I am reluctant to use it until Im sure it is safe to do so!!

  2. #2
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    Rural Somerset, between Yeovil and Shepton Mallet
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    Default Sievert Blow Torch

    I have a Sievert and use a pair of adjustable spanners for tightening the joints. Available at most hardware stores. Do NOT use "mole grips" - they have serrated teeth that will quickly damage the brass, smooth faced adjustable spanners are what you want.

    Test for leaks using diluted soap solution - paint it on the joints and watch for bubbles when the torch is turned on.


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    Last edited by BarryM; 07-09-2015 at 01:34 PM.
    Barry the Flying Silversmith👍

  3. #3
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    Default

    As Barry has said, the Sievert needs to be carefully tightened up at all the different points.

    Tubing into the regulator.
    Bottom of the handpiece.
    Nozzle onto handle.

    When I first started using mine, I didnt tighten the bottom of the handpiece properly and one side of me caught alight! Luckily I was in a shed with the door open and snow as on the ground, and I had the quick thinking to knock the cylinder off immediately otherwise it could have been nasty! Funny with hindsight of course and not a mistake to be repeated.

    Nick

  4. #4
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    Default

    As this is a regular problem with Sieverts, I would say that rather than have an adjustable spanner which might be used elsewhere, or even mislaid, you measure the relevant nut(s) and have the correct spanners always handy for periodic tightening.

    If there is a flare up due to a gas leak, flammable clothing, long hair and hair spray add to the problem. A fire blanket hung in plain view is an inexpensive precaution. Dennis.

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Fire-Blanket-1m-x/dp/B003RUJFM4
    Last edited by Dennis; 07-09-2015 at 02:31 PM.

  5. #5
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis View Post
    As this is a regular problem with Sieverts, I would say that rather than have an adjustable spanner which might be used elsewhere, or even mislaid, you measure the relevant nut(s) and have the correct spanners always handy for periodic tightening.

    If there is a flare up due to a gas leak, flammable clothing, long hair and hair spray add to the problem. A fire blanket hung in plain view is an inexpensive precaution. Dennis.

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Fire-Blanket-1m-x/dp/B003RUJFM4
    Is there another torch anyone would recommend that doesn't have this problem?

  6. #6
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    Karolina, You will have to accept that maintenance goes with the territory. Being a crafts person is not just about making things, but also requires you to keep your tools and equipment in good condition.

    Anything that has been assembled by screwing it together will need a periodic check of the junctions. That said, many members prefer the EZ torch for handling and the fact that the air intake can be reduced to make a less fierce flame when required.

    However you will see from the picture that it arrives in bits and has to be assembled. Dennis.

    http://www.suttontools.co.uk/ez-torch-kit.html

  7. #7
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KarolinaMoon View Post
    Is there another torch anyone would recommend that doesn't have this problem?
    Karoline,

    Is a little bit of an expensive investment to begin with, but I can highly recommend the Smiths Little Torch / Oxycon setup.

    I still use my Sievert every once in a while, but the Smiths is a more powerful and versatile option. Really is excellent, and if you search this forum I did a sort of pictorial tutorial on the subject. I was confused about how the Smith's Torch / Oxycon setup all went together so after working it all out ( and with many questions answered by the experts on here ) I put it all into one easy to understand thread.

    Cheers,

    Nick

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick martin View Post
    Is a little bit of an expensive investment to begin with, but I can highly recommend the Smiths Little Torch / Oxycon setup.
    Unless you're doing larger silversmithing, like bowls - in which case, a Sievert or a Flamefast (forced air + gas) are a better bet.
    Interestingly, I was told by a recent adopter of an oxycon that she finds the flame cooler than working with pure O2 - logical given it's a slightly lower concentration, but I was surprised it was that noticeable.
    They then went on to say that not having to refill an O2 cylinder all the time made it worth the minor inconvenience.

  9. #9
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nick martin View Post
    Karoline,

    Is a little bit of an expensive investment to begin with, but I can highly recommend the Smiths Little Torch / Oxycon setup.

    I still use my Sievert every once in a while, but the Smiths is a more powerful and versatile option. Really is excellent, and if you search this forum I did a sort of pictorial tutorial on the subject. I was confused about how the Smith's Torch / Oxycon setup all went together so after working it all out ( and with many questions answered by the experts on here ) I put it all into one easy to understand thread.

    Cheers,

    Nick
    Nick - which Oxycon do you use and what is the required Oxygen flow rate for the size 7 tip ?


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    Barry the Flying Silversmith👍

  10. #10
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    Mar 2013
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Nick martin View Post
    Karoline,

    Is a little bit of an expensive investment to begin with, but I can highly recommend the Smiths Little Torch / Oxycon setup.

    I still use my Sievert every once in a while, but the Smiths is a more powerful and versatile option. Really is excellent, and if you search this forum I did a sort of pictorial tutorial on the subject. I was confused about how the Smith's Torch / Oxycon setup all went together so after working it all out ( and with many questions answered by the experts on here ) I put it all into one easy to understand thread.

    Cheers,

    Nick

    Happy to say my sievert is back in action again....will keep checking before every use that each joint is tightly attached. Thanks Nick, I may look at getting a smiths little torch in future, I have heard that they were very good!

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