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Thread: Dremel recommendations for newbie

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
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    Default Dremel recommendations for newbie

    Hi all,

    I'm fairly new to jewellery making (and totally new to the forum) and have mostly worked with silver clay. Now I want to up my game and work with sheet silver. Can anyone recommend a Dremel that I can drill holes with - to begin with I just want to drill holes to thread jump rings through but as I become more confident & experienced I will obviously want the Dremel to do more. I've looked on Cooksongold but the range of drills is a bit overwhelming so 1. Which Dremel and 2. Does that come with drill bits to drill holes with.

    Sorry for being so ignorant!! Kim

  2. #2
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    Apr 2010
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    Hello and welcome. It depends how much you want to spend really. I pushed the boat out and got a pendant motor when I first started, but they are quite expensive. Something with a variable speed is quite useful, and not too heavy as you have to hold it. Sorry I can't help more but never owned a dremel, I am sure someone will be on later.

  3. #3
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    Jun 2014
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    I've failed at drilling through silver or copper sheet with my Dremel. It does drill plaster, wood .... but there is something about the torque which makes it very ineffective for drilling metal. It's fine for polishing though and a useful hand tool.

    If all you want to do is drill holes than I'd recommend a bow drill from your favourite source, this is Cookson's http://www.cooksongold.com/Jewellery...prcode-999-331. It takes a little practice, but it works brilliantly. Infinitely better than my Dremel (which is not the low end hobby one, so it's not the model that is the problem, but the tool itself).

  4. #4
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    Aug 2015
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    Thank you both for your replies. I think I will still get a Dremel but also the bow drill which I had seen but thought it might not be so good, so thanks Stacey - I will take up your recommendation

  5. #5
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    I bought a small Proxxon stand drill for drilling holes ....doh what else would you use it for.....it wasn't that e expensive and you can put fairly big drill bits in too. That bow drill looks like something Noah may have used. It's a Proxxon TB 220. Didn't realise it was that much money but its very good.
    Last edited by Patstone; 22-08-2015 at 04:27 PM.

  6. #6
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    Jun 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patstone View Post
    I bought a small Proxxon stand drill for drilling holes ....doh what else would you use it for.....it wasn't that e expensive and you can put fairly big drill bits in too. That bow drill looks like something Noah may have used. It's a Proxxon TB 220. Didn't realise it was that much money but its very good.
    Noah built a rather large wooden ship using his bow drill. Proxon 180 roughly. Bow drill 20. It's rather soothing to use as well. If your objective is to drill holes in sheet than a bow drill works brilliantly.

    When I win the lotterly I'm going to plunk for a Proxon and a Foredom though .... but I suspect I'll still reach for my bow drill once in a while.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patstone View Post
    I bought a small Proxxon stand drill for drilling holes ....doh what else would you use it for.....it wasn't that e expensive and you can put fairly big drill bits in too. That bow drill looks like something Noah may have used. It's a Proxxon TB 220. Didn't realise it was that much money but its very good.
    I love my proxxon bench drill and wouldn't be without it now. It's a piece of equipment that you'll always use no matter what you go on to make. Until its purchase I used only the metal version of the 'bow' drill which used to be called an Archimedes drill because he invented it so you are almost right Pat! And it still works
    Last edited by CJ57; 22-08-2015 at 05:18 PM.

  8. #8
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    Sorry didn't mean to be rude and offend anyone. I am a bit of a tool junkie, could do with selling some of them really. Bought cheap when I started and then of course found that cheap didn't do the job very well. So bought more!!!!!!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stacey View Post
    I've failed at drilling through silver or copper sheet with my Dremel. It does drill plaster, wood .... but there is something about the torque which makes it very ineffective for drilling metal. It's fine for polishing though and a useful hand tool.

    If all you want to do is drill holes than I'd recommend a bow drill from your favourite source, this is Cookson's http://www.cooksongold.com/Jewellery...prcode-999-331. It takes a little practice, but it works brilliantly. Infinitely better than my Dremel (which is not the low end hobby one, so it's not the model that is the problem, but the tool itself).
    There are some tools that are just nice to use then you buy something to be more time efficient, less hard work and a bit more precise sometimes if you drill a lot of holes. I still return to the hand worked originals though although I haven't used the wooden Archimedes since college. There is something about old tools, I even used my grandads wood drill with the handle you have to turn sometimes

  10. #10
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    If you have space in your workshop for a bench drill check these out; https://www.machinemart.co.uk/shop/p...ted-pillar-dri it is only 2 ft. tall and costs 72.

    James
    Last edited by Goldsmith; 22-08-2015 at 05:47 PM.

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