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Thread: Dremel recommendations for newbie

  1. #11
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    Jun 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by CJ57 View Post
    I love my proxxon bench drill and wouldn't be without it now. It's a piece of equipment that you'll always use no matter what you go on to make. Until its purchase I used only the metal version of the 'bow' drill which used to be called an Archimedes drill because he invented it so you are almost right Pat! And it still works
    The archimedes drill http://www.cooksongold.com/Jewellery...prcode-999-330 is similar to a bow drill in that it uses person power and not electricity to move the drill bit. It takes pretty much forever to make a hole with an Archimedian drill, the bow drill is much speedier. I've heard others praise the Proxxon too. I know there are cheaper out there, but from the hours I spent researching bench drills and reading reviews before coming to my financial senses the Proxxon comes out tops.

  2. #12
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    Jun 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patstone View Post
    Sorry didn't mean to be rude and offend anyone. I am a bit of a tool junkie, could do with selling some of them really. Bought cheap when I started and then of course found that cheap didn't do the job very well. So bought more!!!!!!
    You didn't offend me. I agree with the adage that when you buy cheap you buy twice, but if you're not in production mode then many times the simpler tools will do and do well.

  3. #13
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    Jun 2014
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    Kim,

    When you order don't forget you need a center punch http://www.cooksongold.com/category_...omSuggest=true (you can buy automatic ones as well from Cookson or cheaper elsewhere) so that your drill bit has something to keep it steady before you start drilling with any type of drill.

  4. #14
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    Feb 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stacey View Post
    The archimedes drill http://www.cooksongold.com/Jewellery...prcode-999-330 is similar to a bow drill in that it uses person power and not electricity to move the drill bit. It takes pretty much forever to make a hole with an Archimedian drill, the bow drill is much speedier. I've heard others praise the Proxxon too. I know there are cheaper out there, but from the hours I spent researching bench drills and reading reviews before coming to my financial senses the Proxxon comes out tops.
    The Archimedes I trained on in the 70s is definitely what they now call a bow drill and your link is called an Archimedes twist elsewhere, it works well too but as you say slow. Fire scale used to be fire stain and I still call it that, I also still use BMG for metal thickness and have to look up the Cookson table. They just keep on changing the names to confuse me!
    The proxxon is ideal because it's so small and takes up very little bench space and if you buy the universal chuck as well as the fiddly wee things they provide then you are sorted for all sizes of drill. The vice is a bit of a waste as it can only be fixed in one direction and still moves side to side and I can't get anyone to tell me how to make it otherwise. What's the point of having to hold onto the vice?

  5. #15
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    Jun 2015
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    If drilling silver is your main thing, I would seriously consider not choosing a Dremel. I have a one and it is useful for all sorts of other things, including drilling glass, but the low torque and relatively high speeds make it less than ideal for drilling metals. If you definitely need a powered drill, Proxxon or similar would be a better bet.

    Though it's a great tool in some respects, I'm frustrated by the limitations of my Dremel and am now saving up for a good micro motor - but those are seriously expensive!

    Alan

  6. #16
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    Jul 2009
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    Romsey
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stacey View Post
    When you order don't forget you need a center punch http://www.cooksongold.com/category_...omSuggest=true (you can buy automatic ones as well from Cookson or cheaper elsewhere) so that your drill bit has something to keep it steady before you start drilling with any type of drill.
    Pretty much anything slightly pointy will work as a centre punch on soft metals - if I need a centre dot then I'll usually use a graver. If you use a spear point drill then they won't wander, but that's only really ideal with a bow drill; twist drills similarly aren't great with the bow drill. The way I sharpen my twist drills mean they don't wander (well, unless I goof the sharpening).

    Personally, I'd probably use a bow drill more if the thing were about half the size.

    Quote Originally Posted by ajda View Post
    If drilling silver is your main thing, I would seriously consider not choosing a Dremel. I have a one and it is useful for all sorts of other things, including drilling glass, but the low torque and relatively high speeds make it less than ideal for drilling metals. If you definitely need a powered drill, Proxxon or similar would be a better bet.
    Agreed. I started out using a Dremel and I would not recommend it, especially if stone setting. An inexpensive pendant motor with a foot pedal is a better bet (eg http://www.axminster.co.uk/axminster...ble-drive-unit ), but (even a cheap) micromotor would be even better. Plenty of threads on them.

  7. #17
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    Dec 2009
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    Dremels are enticing for beginners, but turn out to be a total waste of money for jewellers. If you can't visualise a time when you will have saved enough cash for an expensive motor, then you should consider a Marathon micromotor from China, which can be had for less than 100 including freight, taxes and handling charge.

    I have had one as a spare for a year and find that I prefer the way it handles to my four times more expensive Ram Products one. Dennis

  8. #18
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    Mar 2010
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    Braunton, North Devon
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    I have a pendant motor from Axminster. It's more than adequate. Actually it's a really good piece of kit for the money!

    Sarah

  9. #19
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    Jun 2015
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    Great tip re Marathon micromotors, Dennis - do you know if there's any chuck-type fitting that you can use with those instead of the standard collets?

  10. #20
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    Dec 2009
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    No, the handpieces will only take 2.35 mm shanks, but that is not usually a disadvantage, unless you already have a stash of Dremel tools.

    The models have different looking control boxes, but the straight hand pieces, which contain the motor and are intended for workshops, all look alike. They also offer contra angle handpieces and a short straight handpiece for dental surgery use, but for those the lead will have a separate motor with a slip joint for ease of removal.

    Lastly there is a choice of either a foot switch, or a variable speed foot control. Both are optional, as the machine can be switched on and the speed can be varied manually with the foot item disconnected. Dennis.

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