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Thread: Headpins

  1. #1
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    Default Headpins

    I dont normally make headpins but when I do mine dont seem to be perfectly round, is there a knack to this or is it just pot luck and filing after.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patstone View Post
    I dont normally make headpins but when I do mine dont seem to be perfectly round, is there a knack to this or is it just pot luck and filing after.
    Nor do I Pat, but I had a session of experimenting. I found that keeping the wire vertical was essential obviously. Using a bushy flame and withdrawing it slowly also gave a better result.

    I have read here that tarnish resistant silver was ideal for this, but I cant remember which. I think it was Argentium.

    You can also tap the heads flat if you thread the pin into a draw plate or a watchmakers riveting block. Regards, Dennis.

  3. #3
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    Argentium is brilliant for this Pat. Balls up like a dream.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by caroleallen View Post
    Argentium is brilliant for this Pat. Balls up like a dream.
    Agreed - I use 960 grade from Allied Gold, and 935 is available from Cooksons. Apart from balling up nicely for headpins, you don't get firescale and it needs minimal pickling and cleaning. You might find this link useful as a starting point - http://riograndeblog.com/2011/08/mak...david-plumlee/

  5. #5
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    I just use fine silver, no fire scale issues it either.
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  6. #6
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    I use fine for pendants and earrings, but it wouldn't last a minute on a bangle.

  7. #7
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    Another advantage of Argentium is that you can harden it in an oven/kiln (precipitation hardening) - which at the same time improves its tarnish resistance.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by ajda View Post
    Another advantage of Argentium is that you can harden it in an oven/kiln (precipitation hardening) - which at the same time improves its tarnish resistance.
    great if you have one or the other.

    Quote Originally Posted by caroleallen View Post
    I use fine for pendants and earrings, but it wouldn't last a minute on a bangle.
    must admit, I only do them occasionally, and for earrings, necklaces and chain bracelets to hold beads on - I use relatively thick wire, but one day will probably find it better to use something else for the bracelets.
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wallace View Post
    great if you have one or the other.
    A domestic oven is all you need (300C for 1.5-2 hours is ideal, but slightly lower for slightly longer will do it). In any case, Argentium work hardens much the same as traditional sterling. Either way it won't be as soft as fine silver.

  10. #10
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    My domestic oven tops out at 230C, but it's a time/temperature transition thing (yeah, your version was plainer English )
    My kiln will hit 1200C, which gives all sorts of potential.
    Last edited by ps_bond; 21-08-2015 at 09:18 PM.

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