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Thread: Newbie with a Torch!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    London. Thames Valley now Monmouthshire
    Posts
    8

    Default Newbie with a Torch!

    Hi All,

    I have just bought the Sievert Torch, it arrived today. I have connected it to a small Propane bottle, followed all the instructions and all worked well. However, it appears that no matter which way I turn the Regulator knob, up or down, it doesn't appear to have any effect on the flame. I am using the smallest flame attachment. Can anyone who uses the Sievert please advise me on where I should ideally set the regulator?

    Many thanks in advance

    Mark

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Oxon
    Posts
    394

    Default

    You may have an extra low pressure regulator on the cylinder(37mb if I remember
    May not be enough oomph

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    London. Thames Valley now Monmouthshire
    Posts
    8

    Default Sievert Torch Regulator

    Quote Originally Posted by trialuser View Post
    You may have an extra low pressure regulator on the cylinder(37mb if I remember
    May not be enough oomph
    Thanks for the response it is most appreciated.

    As far as power coming out of the bottle is concerned, it is fine. There is a nice hot blue flame however, I need to know where the regulator should be set for safety sake. On the top of the regulator is the following info:

    Po: 0-4 bar
    Pi max : 16 bar
    Q : 8 kg/hr
    Model : 460

    But at the moment with this tip on, turning the knob either way has no effect. Maybe it is for when I am using a much larger tip, say for melting?

    Thanks
    Mark

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    2,353

    Default

    I've had my sievert for nearly 40 years and have never used the small burner for anything it's still in the box. I use a medium burner for all jobs. It probably doesn't answer the question about the regulator though!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    cotswolds
    Posts
    3,205

    Default

    If it helps, for a single torch, I usually set my regulator at around 1 bar.

    I'm sure it's teaching granny, but there will always be someone out there that might read this and learn - always remember to turn the gas on fully at the bottom, so that if you need to turn it off in a hurry, there can be no doubt about which way you're turning the knob.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Manchester
    Posts
    632

    Default

    Remembering which way the gas knob turns off is easy if you think of it as a tap. Few of us would try turning the bath tap anticlockwise to turn it off.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Banbury
    Posts
    167

    Default

    Ah Aurarius! If only remembering which way to turn a tap was that easy. For years I have been heard to mutter "Righty - tighty, lefty - loosey, now, which one is left?
    Didi

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    cotswolds
    Posts
    3,205

    Default

    Not all taps are created equal... Our taps in the Caribbean turn the 'wrong' way.

    (and I have no idea where the 'at the bottom' in my post above came from, but I'm no longer able to edit it.)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    London
    Posts
    144

    Default

    Having struggled with two Sievert torches at home (one Iíve already sold and the other Iím about to sell), I recently took purchase of an Orca torch and tried it out for the first time yesterday. What a difference!

    Itís lighter weight, shorter hose with quicker ignition, together with the ability to alter the amount of air in the gas mix makes soldering a dream.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Central London
    Posts
    7,359

    Default

    Well jewellers are painfully traditional and simply won't countenance anything new. For 'new' read only thirty years old. I also have a bee in my bonnet about flexshafts v. micromotors.

    What is worse, newbies insist on taking up the antiquated ways, for fear of not doing it the real way. Rant over. Dennis.

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