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Thread: frosting wheels

  1. #1
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    Default frosting wheels

    Hi, not sure where this post really ought to be, so sorry if its not in the right place. I was just wondering if anyone had photo's they could post of finishes they have achieved using various frosting wheels. Cookson's have extra fine, fine, medium and coarse for pendant motors, but its hard to know which one to go for when you don't know what the finish they give actually looks like. I don't want to buy them all - they are SO expensive! I'm wanting a nice matt white finish - someone suggested I just leave stuff as it is when it comes out of the pickle - but that doesn't work, it goes horrible and grubby really quickly, and doesn't feel nice either and I'm not happy with the results I've got by just using scotchbrite pads and wire wool, it scuffs too easily and looks a bit of a mess anyway (due, no doubt to my own ineptitude). So, anyway, that's why I was wondering if anyone had photos of their finishes along with info of which grade frosting wheel used. Thanks
    Sue.

  2. #2
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    Ooooh nice thread! I'm following this one for sure!
    All the gear and no idea

  3. #3
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    Sue, I cannot comment on frosting wheels as I don't use them. I was taught to add frosting by using a 4 inch diameter brass bristle mop on a polishing motor. The frosting is achieved by polishing the surface first with standard mops, then adding the frosting onto the polished surface by holding a pencil size stick into the spinning brass mop's bristles, which breaks their spin and makes the ends of the bristles strike the surface. I push the stick into the spinning mop's bristles just above where I hold the item for frosting, this is easier to show than explain.
    This was the system I used to achieve the frosted background behind this crest.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    James

  4. #4
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    Hi Sue,

    Frosting wheels give a texture rather like silver sandpaper and are easy to use, provided that you can regulate the speed on your machine. Used too fast, they will shed their wires and quickly go bald.

    The best one to buy, is the medium (blue) and with care will last me a year or so. The fine one is too delicate and the coarse one too destructive to small pieces.
    They are best applied as late in the construction as possible, because heating and pickling reduces the effect.

    Strangely they are not all that painful on fingers, but eye protection is essential. You can actually mask an area with tape to make a smooth border. They can also be used as an afterthought if the back of a piece looks scratched or untidy, because they will quickly improve unsightly defects. Dennis
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails bez Zigzag Bucle Front.jpg   bez Zigzag Bucle Reverse.jpg  

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  6. #6
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    Default

    this is with the Cooksons extra fine (yellow) wheel. Click image for larger version. 

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    I use them right at the end, just prior to stone setting.
    Here is a twit using one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WzC-yPGpotQ

    ETA: I've worn a ring finished with it a few times and it seems to be holding up well so far.
    Last edited by LydiaNiz; 15-04-2015 at 09:56 PM.

  7. #7
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    Ooooh Lydia, now I've seen your one, I cant decide between Dennis's medium and your extra fine - they both look great - I think I'll start by getting Dennis's medium just in case the finish doesn't last very well on the very fine, as I'm having an issue with the necklace I want it for, and the different panels of it clanging together. Like the video though! Thanks enigma, I have used a scotchbrite, as it came with the foredom motor that I got for xmas, but its just not quite as robust a finish as I want (maybe I'm doing it wrong). James, your frosty finish is really great, but I don't have a polishing motor, and I think I'd probably need quite a bit of practice to get the technique you are using right. I can't tell you how jealous I am of all you lovely people and all your experience, and training - I so wish I had found this activity many years ago! I am hooked now. Hope you are getting all this Vos, it is so useful to see photo's of the finish with each different thing used to get that finish isn't it.

  8. #8
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    I have the media and coarse one, but find the medium is sufficient for most items. As Dennis has said, it can be particularly useful for the backs of pieces.


    The dog was done with the coarse, the bird & blossom brooch with the medium, the hedgehog with a diamond wheel and the sunflower with the scotchbrite mentioned by Sarah.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMG_1556.jpg   2014-08-19 16.06.47.jpg   Bird and Blossom Brooch.jpg   IMG_2059.jpg  

  9. #9
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    Ha Ha, they'll run out of stock with you selling them Lydia. I hope you've watched the sub titles. How do they get them so wrong?

  10. #10
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    subtitles??

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