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Thread: White Gold solder and nickle

  1. #11
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    Jul 2009
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    Hi

    We do have a nickel free 18ct white solder available from our French business, the product code is PP1300 and I'm requesting a price now. It is somewhere between a medium and a hord with a melting point of 830C

    I will let you know as soon as the price is available and the leadtime

    rgs Rob

  2. #12
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    Well done Rob Taylor, looks like you've come up trumps after all. It would be interesting to have a brief explanation of why there is a problem with this. Dennis.
    Last edited by Dennis; 14-04-2015 at 02:52 PM.

  3. #13
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    Jun 2012
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    I thought it's worth mentioning, while I was waiting for Rob to get back to me today I looked for other suppliers, and found one with no mention of nickle or the legislation in the listing, feeling suspicious I contacted them on the webchat and they said they would test the solder for me, they came back to me to say it had nickle. I've told them to update their listing so hopefully they will, but might be something for people to keep an eye out for, with this alloy at the very least.

  4. #14
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    Sep 2011
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    Well, no it doesn't, SJEgan. The seller cannot shift legal responsibility with a disclaimer. If something is illegal to sell then - hey - it's illegal to sell it. Whether your buyer is the end user or not
    www.Pearlescence.co.uk
    @pearlescenceltd
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  5. #15
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    Yes true but I think they law is to cover the finished piece of jewellery, so the solder is maybe legal, you can't wear it without bonding it in some way to something else. But hey I'm not an expert, I'm just the person who wanted to buy some solder and make a ring without giving my customer a rash. It sounds like cookson are going to sort it now, it also seems like they're not the only company to drop the ball on this but at least they had the disclaimer since the other company I looked at didn't.

  6. #16
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    A disclaimer actually makes it worse because it is an admission you know you are doing something wrong! Dur.
    www.Pearlescence.co.uk
    @pearlescenceltd
    instagram: pearlescenceltd1

  7. #17
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    Aug 2012
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    Oxon
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    To be fair to cookson, I don't think the 'disclaimer' in the solder description is a disclaimer. I read it as a statement of fact.
    Solder is also used in items which are not in direct and prolonged contact with skin.

    If the 'offence' is in the 'selling' (not supply) of a non compliant article, what if you gave them the ring and sold them a very expensive box to keep it in - joking of course, I understand you are concerned for the customer as much as the technicalities of the law.

  8. #18
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    trialuser...if the disclaimer is a statement of fact then it says 'we are breaking the law. We know we are breaking the law but we are going to do it anyway'
    Remarkable
    www.Pearlescence.co.uk
    @pearlescenceltd
    instagram: pearlescenceltd1

  9. #19
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    Jul 2009
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    Hi
    According to the Nickel Directive there are 2 limits set for products containing Nickel; one for products used in piercings and another for products intended to come into direct and prolonged contact with the skin. So when we state This solder is not fully compliant with EN1811:2011 it means it is not suitable for products that are inserted into piercings, it is however suitable for products intended to come into direct and prolonged contact with the skin.

    Responsibility for the nickel compliance of the finished article remains with the article designer.
    Nickel compliance applies to finished product; so if we sell pendants, rings or earrings we (like you) have to ensure Nickel content falls within the legislation. If we sell bullion we have no knowledge or control as to what you do with it therefore you must ensure compliance. You may be making earrings that require compliance or an objet d'art which does not. However we have a duty of care to ensure that we can provide information to allow you to make informed decisions.

    I hope this helps
    Rob

  10. #20
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    Jul 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Taylor View Post
    According to the Nickel Directive there are 2 limits set for products containing Nickel; one for products used in piercings and another for products intended to come into direct and prolonged contact with the skin. So when we state This solder is not fully compliant with EN1811:2011 it means it is not suitable for products that are inserted into piercings, it is however suitable for products intended to come into direct and prolonged contact with the skin.
    Ah, the thing that confused me is the only limit I've seen mentioned as being tested for in EN1811:2011 was the higher release rate. Duff precis.

    So you can use this happily to solder a post onto an earring, but it mustn't be part of the inserted bit of the post? (No, I'm not sure how you'd do that either)

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