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Thread: Efcolour enamel

  1. #1
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    Default Efcolour enamel

    Hi everyone, long time since i posted, almost feel like a newby :-)
    Hope everyone is keeping well and busy.
    I really could do with a bit of advice,
    I want to try my hand at enameling, I don't have a kiln and can't see my ever being able to buy one in the very near future, looked at the epoxy and don't like the sound of that, sensitive nostrils so was looking at the Efcolour enamels, can't find for the life of me what they are, eg epoxy, resin, glass or what, have even searched the internet.

    I have added the starter pack to my basket just in case they are what i need, but also looking for the right glue or whatever it is that will allow my to enamel on non flat surfaces.

    And last but not least, have any of you tried it ??

    Thanks
    Jax :-)
    Self teaching with the memory span of a gold fish

  2. #2
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    Hi Jax

    essentially they are plastics. Coating the metal, warm the metal, the coating melts and stays on - unless you sand it. There is still a risk when using, due to the heat and plastic fumes. You don't need the 'kiln'. I used an old upturned bread tin, an old aluminium tray fashioned into a little trivet that was heated with three candles. That did the job brilliantly.You can reheat it a few times. It is nice, but ice resin 'enamels' are much better. Great gadget and great with kids on copper. Although I did use it very successfully for a specific customer request on a liverbird pendant.

  3. #3
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    Sep 2014
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    Did you watch the video? I think thats the one our lovely Lydia did if I remember correctly

  4. #4
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    Hi Wallace, thank you so much for replying it was doing my head in trying to find out so glad to know they are a plastic coating, they won't be what i'm after, :-)

    Hi Enigma, yes i did thank you, she was very easy to understand :-)

    Back to the drawing board for me :-)
    Thanks again :-)
    Jax
    Self teaching with the memory span of a gold fish

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    If you wanted to use real enamels (sorry, I'm a snob and to me enamel is ground glass and not plastic or resin or whatever) could you torch fire them? I've never done it (seems tricky!), but I know a lot of people do so.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by medusa View Post
    If you wanted to use real enamels (sorry, I'm a snob and to me enamel is ground glass and not plastic or resin or whatever) could you torch fire them? I've never done it (seems tricky!), but I know a lot of people do so.
    totally agree, enamels are traditionally glass.

    plastics and resins are not 'enamels' imho they should be called coatings!

    they are still fun to work with though - just need a better point of reference for them
    Last edited by Wallace; 24-02-2015 at 02:26 PM.

  7. #7
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    Yes got to agree, enamel is enamel and there should be more information especially on the Efcolur.

    I have been watching youtube torch fire enameling for a few month, guess I have been trying to pluck up the courage to try this method, by the looks of it if I want the true enamel i'm going to have to bite the bullet and give it a go, could be disastrous or work out, only one way to find out for sure
    Self teaching with the memory span of a gold fish

  8. #8
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    Nov 2012
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    I've always torch fired my enamels. I just balance the piece between 2 charcoal bricks and heat from the back.The charcoal holds the heat nicely. Works well until you misjudge the gap between the bricks and drop it all! Only joking with that but you have to get the gap right.

  9. #9
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    Hi Anna, thanks for that info, i must remember to have lots of water to handy then ;-) I have charcoal, but they are just small pieces, need to get new so would be good to try on that before getting a tripod.
    I did notice on one of the utube vids that they used klear fire adhesive but not found that on cookies is there an alternative ?
    Self teaching with the memory span of a gold fish

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
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    Sorry if I didn't explain clearly. The charcoal bricks are on a fire brick inside a tin with 3 sides so no danger of fire at all. Not sure what the fire adhesive is for.I just use the enamel powder straight onto the metal but I always have a rim around the edge of the piece. I've attached an awful picture of some recently done pieces.The enamel looks marked but it wasn't.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Enamelled pendants 022.JPG 
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Size:	65.6 KB 
ID:	7438
    Last edited by Anna Wales; 24-02-2015 at 04:55 PM.

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