View Poll Results: Where did you get your skills?

Voters
79. You may not vote on this poll
  • Self Taught only

    30 37.97%
  • Self taught and the odd short course

    30 37.97%
  • Series of longer courses but no qualification

    5 6.33%
  • FE qualification (A Level, OND etc)

    0 0%
  • HE qualification (HND, Degree etc)

    4 5.06%
  • Apprenticeship

    5 6.33%
  • Self Taught then Qualification

    0 0%
  • Self Taught then Apprenticeship

    1 1.27%
  • Natural talent from birth

    2 2.53%
  • something else (please say)

    2 2.53%
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Thread: self taught, apprenticed, night school or degree trained?

  1. #41
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Staffordshire
    Posts
    1,727

    Default

    and the ability to understand what the tools will and won't do and how that blends with traditional theory/techniques....

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    724

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by caroleallen View Post
    That's true up to a point Chris but the ability to design comes into it too.
    That's a topic I'll avoid. Plenty of "designers" are clueless of the practical side of things.

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Cornwall
    Posts
    3,172

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gemsetterchris View Post
    That's a topic I'll avoid. Plenty of "designers" are clueless of the practical side of things.
    I'd say the ability to design and to produce the work is what makes a jeweller. A designer is just a designer.

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    East Sussex
    Posts
    85

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    I worked in workshops 40 years ago then in early eighties went to epsom art school and got a Higher Surrey Diploma in jewellery making. Have only got back into it as a hobby in the last 4 years as I have been off work for many months with severe back pain. I have a small home workshop and have been only working in Silver, because I like it! I am still using tools from college days and now buy the best I can afford.

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Alberta, Canada
    Posts
    13

    Default

    I am mainly self taught (by that I mean you tube and online tutorials). I inherited my late great uncle's lapidary and jewelry making equipment and supplies when he passed away and that is what gave me my start... but I am really hoping to start taking some silversmithing classes offered by one of the local shops where I live. I have learned a lot online but I can't help but think that there is something more to learn from an expert in person.

    Rock Shelley

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Bishops Stortford
    Posts
    10

    Default

    had to vote 'something else'

    I entered the trade with various jobs at the bench before learning how to use CAD and then doing some short coureses. You could loosely describe my time as the bench as an apprenticeship but it certainly wast structured or organised as they are now. The trade is so much further on in terms of training than it was 10 years ago.

  7. #47
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Reading, Berkshire
    Posts
    262

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    I did a degree initially but then sort of an apprenticeship where i was kind of left to my own devices most of the time but I learnt a lot doing it that way. I now work for a jewellers mostly doing repairs but have my own business too.

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Posts
    9

    Default

    Started with a years adult education evening classes, with lots of internet videos and tutorials and lots of books...if I see something that interests me I will try to work out how it was made and have a crack on my own version. These forums are invaluable too. I recently did a gem setting course at Creatstudio in Faversham which was brilliant...interestingly enough out of the 8 in the workshop 6 had recent jewellery design degrees and were doing the course because they had not been taught the actual practical skills necessary to work with metals. All that money spent and they still had to pay to learn how to make anything...they could knit a necklace out of carrier bags but couldn't actually solder anything!!!

  9. #49
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Exeter, Devon
    Posts
    1,783

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    There are a lot of academics like that. My daughters lodger is highly qualified something in the science field I believe and he can barely tie his shoelaces, but can work anything out on paper. Which would you rather be, I know my choice, you can get by in life being practical and doing most things, but unless you can find someone who can work to your plans on paper you are stuck.

  10. #50
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    724

    Default

    I had a chat with a CAD expert with a well known casting company a while ago, lots of "designers" submitting files that just simply won`t work since they have zero knowledge of the process required to turn a model into an actual piece.

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