View Poll Results: Where did you get your skills?

Voters
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  • Self Taught only

    30 37.97%
  • Self taught and the odd short course

    30 37.97%
  • Series of longer courses but no qualification

    5 6.33%
  • FE qualification (A Level, OND etc)

    0 0%
  • HE qualification (HND, Degree etc)

    4 5.06%
  • Apprenticeship

    5 6.33%
  • Self Taught then Qualification

    0 0%
  • Self Taught then Apprenticeship

    1 1.27%
  • Natural talent from birth

    2 2.53%
  • something else (please say)

    2 2.53%
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Thread: self taught, apprenticed, night school or degree trained?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Posts
    373

    Default

    Self taught using books, videos and of course the advise of the lovely people on this forum.
    Sian Williamson

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Posts
    2,063

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    Im amazed that Hans is self taught, there is hope for us all then!
    Seriously Hans, I had a look on your website and your work is absolutely fantastic.

    We are all so lucky in these days of internet resources and so many generous folk putting their techniques out there for us to learn, its a wonderful thing.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    2,490

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    I did a a 4 year diploma course at Edinburgh College of Art 74-79 They amalgamated with Heriot Watt University during my last year and it then became a degree course the following year. Still learning from books and forums

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    724

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    I did a pre-apprenticeship course followed by 5 yr apprenticeship, also working in a workshop with a couple of goldsmiths for a few years helped alot in understanding both setting & goldsmithing (for everyone).
    Since that I`ve learnt alot more from the internet, discussions & good old experimentation...you never stop learning & adapting.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    53

    Default

    "I am amazed at your "self taught" enameling Hans, I am currently teaching myself enameling but with far less success as seen in your pieces...who have you been watching / reading?"

    Nothing amazing. Just doggedness. I have boxes of failures in my cupboard.

    I am teaching myself enamel painting but before that I painted oils for many years, so that helps.

    Normal enameling like cloisonne and plique-a-jour I have been doing since the early eighties so I am not really a beginner.

    I think James and those that did an apprenticeship would agree with me when I say that the apprenticeship is more about teaching the discipline of the thing first.

    The ground work is all important in any craft, be that goldsmithing, gem cutting or setting.

    And also having someone show you is wonderful. It really cuts down the time in learning.

    But in the end the learning process can be summarized down to four stages.

    1 Unconscious incompetence : you do not know what you don't know.

    2 Conscious incompetence : you do know what you don't know

    3 Conscious competence: You know how to do something well.

    4 Unconscious competence: When you teach others and you realize you have forgotten how difficult it was to learn the process in the beginning.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    1,744

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hans Meevis View Post
    I clicked self taught but of course that is strictly speaking not true.
    No one is self taught, shown by the very fact that everyone on this site learns from others here as well.
    Take enamel painting, which is what I am teaching myself the skill of.
    But I have learned the tricks and methodology from other artists, web sites, books and videos.
    All of those help me to increase my skill, but I learn from others.
    Self taught is a more romantic term though.
    quit picking apart my terms! I'm NEVER romantic! But yes, I (begrudgingly) suppose self-taught is a misnomer. Like Sarah I was really surprised that you were self taught. I imagined you had done the apprenticeship route.

    Quote Originally Posted by Goldsmith View Post
    The only qualifications I have are these; I am a Freeman of the Most Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths, gained through service, a Freeman of the City of London and a Fellow of The Institute of Professional Goldsmiths.

    James
    You make those sound like a CSE! I really think the gold standard (no pun intended) is an apprenticeship. If I had had the foresight at 18, that is the route I should have taken.


    Quote Originally Posted by Hans Meevis View Post

    And also having someone show you is wonderful. It really cuts down the time in learning. agreed.

    But in the end the learning process can be summarized down to four stages.

    1 Unconscious incompetence : you do not know what you don't know.

    2 Conscious incompetence : you do know what you don't know

    3 Conscious competence: You know how to do something well.

    4 Unconscious competence: When you teach others and you realize you have forgotten how difficult it was to learn the process in the beginning.
    Excellent breakdown. I'm half way between 1 and 2.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    London
    Posts
    886

    Default

    BA in Jewellery and Silversmithing after getting the metalwork bug doing a jewellery elective in the 6th form, then just tinkered on my kitchen table for a while. After that I worked Saturdays for a proper old-school jeweller who had left school and done an apprenticeship - learned way more practical skills from him than I ever did at college! Very much still learning and wish I had the time and money to do more courses - the stone setting one I did last year was invaluable.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Hertfordshire
    Posts
    26

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    BA Industrial Design/Jewellery and Silversmithing 1972-75 Birmingham

    Worked for myself until the late 80's had a 20+year break then rediscovered my studio and tools in 2012 have been re-learning all over again since then

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Finland
    Posts
    724

    Default

    Taking a lesson wether a short specific course or a long apprenticeship will get you on the right track fast..but...It's a long trip from there on.
    Experience & practical doing has no shortcuts..to be able to overcome or avoid every obstacle you come across takes a while.

    Nowadays with the new tools available & the internet, It's so easy to get the basic idea & result..you just need a shed load of practicing with different projects & It's very important to make mistakes, because you can't master something without making a few & learning from them

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    268

    Default

    Mainly self taught using books, online tutorials, videos and a lot of trial and error. Did one day a week with a silver/goldsmith for a about a 6 month period a few years ago, which did move me on a lot, but couldn't carry on when he moved and I got pregnant... If I had the chance to start again from scratch I would definitely do an apprenticeship. Hoping to do some short courses in future, especially stone setting.

    Carin
    Carin Lindberg

    Camali Design
    www.camalidesign.com

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