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Thread: Book Recommendations - Stone setting

  1. #21
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    I've a book by Wykoff? Published in '86 which is about when I started college.
    It's good & a lot still applies, but techniques get tweaked & tools improve..so while you can do well with an "older"book (being careful here)
    Why not learn what's new?
    It's not vastly different & you might not have the latest tools..but you gotta keep up to speed if It's your profession?


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  2. #22
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    I get that keeping up with new tools is important, especially if you are working as a professional setter, I was just curious about ~how~ different the techniques are was all. I'm probably just trying to find excuses to avoid doing ~any~ setting though

  3. #23
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    that depends on your needs.
    Big enough difference for my requirements but maybe nothing to worry for someone else...

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  4. #24
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    I think that all sounds very exciting and very interesting. I definitely think there's a market out there Chris.

    Are/were you looking at becoming UK based, btw......I have a dim and distant memory that you were!! You're quite right, Peter is a rather clever boy methinks, I'd offer to proof read as a novice, but would be more helpful with grammar than anything else......then again making sense to a novice, might make a lot of sense!!!! (Well......I convinced myself )

  5. #25
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    Still contemplating the re-locate..
    Lots to think about now

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  6. #26
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    ugh, unless there were pressing personal or family reasons, I'd stick with Finland!

    That said you could always expand your income by giving tuition if you were UK based. I look forward to the PDFs as well. And strongly recommend you get them proof-read and road tested by a beginner/intermediate worker. As Jill says a novice will be able to really test out the process. Jill, you are miles from being a novice! (I'm not volunteering, either)

  7. #27
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    Thanks everyone, have now ordered the Cogswell book as well as the new Eid / Longhi book on metal forming as thats an area Im very keen on getting into.

    Cheers,

    Nick

  8. #28
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    I have the creative setting book by Cogswell and also an Anastasia Young book, but really struggled with setting until I booked some physical tuition. It was so useful to see all the ways in which my self taught setting was going horribly wrong!

    I need to find time to go and look through the books again, as I think now I (vaguely) know what I'm doing with the basics, I reckon I'll get a lot more out of the books.

  9. #29
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    Too late a response from me (another vote for Cogswell) but for future reference for anyone else - you could always borrow the Cogswell from any library via an inter-library loan.

    Chris - I would definitely be interested in the tutorials
    Indi

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by medusa View Post
    ugh, unless there were pressing personal or family reasons, I'd stick with Finland!

    That said you could always expand your income by giving tuition if you were UK based. I look forward to the PDFs as well. And strongly recommend you get them proof-read and road tested by a beginner/intermediate worker. As Jill says a novice will be able to really test out the process. Jill, you are miles from being a novice! (I'm not volunteering, either)
    Well yes and no Liz, I do set some stones, but I get a fair amount of my work set by a professional setter (like Chris), that is their speciality, they set the stone in a fraction of the time I could and do a far better job, my time is better spent doing what I do best, designing, making the pieces and settings,........let the setter set the stone...

    One thing I've learned over the past 7 years and in moving from hobbyist to full time job, and believe me this took some coming to terms with and accepting, is where my skills and expertise is, where my time is best spent and where I am better paying for a job to be done well.....I would love to be able to set stones and learn all the techniques, but there are only so many hours in the day......

    I am currently focussing on 'traditional' diamond mounting, I have been for about 18-24 months, honing my saw piercing and making skills, the detail of this and the skills transfer to my other work, but it is the adjustment of a 10th of a mm that makes all the difference....so precise, it still feels almost impossible!!!!!

    ......but I love the challenge

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