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Thread: Protecting cufflink arms when soldering

  1. #1
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    Default Protecting cufflink arms when soldering

    Hello

    I was just wondering what I can use to protect the join on cufflinks arms when soldering? I find that after soldering & pickling they leak something that turns black! I guess it's some kind of oil/grease on the joint but it makes a mess to have to clean up. Any ways to stop this?

    Many thanks
    Victoria

  2. #2
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    When I make cuff links I buy the U arms and cuff swivels separate. Then I solder the U shaped arms to the link plates and then pickle and clean them up before riveting the swivel arms in place. This also means that the spring in the swivel remains at it's maximum strength as sometimes over heating the swivels while soldering can damage the swivel's interior spring.

    James

  3. #3
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    Thanks James...though I confess I was looking for an easy option, not more work But I will look into doing them separately!

    Suggestions for protecting joints would still be welcome

  4. #4
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    Hi Victoria
    I agree with James, buy separate and then join with riveting after soldering. May seem more work but frankly protecting the joint would be tricky and possibly take longer in the long run as it is more likely not to work. Sorry.
    Didi

  5. #5
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    Hi Victoria,

    I have used this in the past http://www.cooksongold.com/Jewellery...prcode-999-AAH , but have to agree with the others, once I used the complete findings up I have only used the separate parts and riveted afterwards, far better results!!

    Tabby xx

  6. #6
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    Of course you could abandon bought findings, make a button or torpedo for the other end and connect them with chain, about five links, or a solid curved bar made from thick wire, or cut from sheet.

    This would give your work an authentic studio look. Dennis

  7. #7
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    Perhaps hold the section containing the spring in soldering tweezers or better still in the gentle grip of an old pair of pliers (which you can hold shut with an elastic band round the handles) making sure there's lots of metal-metal contact, then direct all your heat at the pieces being soldered - the heatsinking effect should be enough to stop the spring losing its temper and any oil burning off - I can't sweat it'll work but this is how I'd approach it.

    Shaun/FloWolF

  8. #8
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    Thanks everyone! I will definitely give the riveting a go. I was also thinking about creating fixed t-bar's but not sure what the best dimensions are for this? I've seen some where one side of the top bar is longer than the other side...but as I've never actually worn cufflinks I don't know what the best fit is?

    Shaun - that's basically what I already do to protect the join from melting completely...doesn't seem to stop the mini oil slick though!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Victoria View Post
    T I was also thinking about creating fixed t-bar's but not sure what the best dimensions are for this? I've seen some where one side of the top bar is longer than the other side...but as I've never actually worn cufflinks I don't know what the best fit is?
    A quick visit to a shirt shop would clarify things for you Victoria and allow you to browse the cufflinks on offer. If cutting the fixed bar from sheet, it is usually tapered as in my sketch. The second fixing can be a button, a ball, or a cone shape. If using a torpedo, or cross bar, the cufflink would have to be rotated afterwards, so is more fiddly to use.

    The inner distance from button to button is about 12.00mm. Dennis.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Cufflink Bar..jpg  

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