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Thread: Bench polisher

  1. #1
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    Apr 2010
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    Exeter, Devon
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    Default Bench polisher

    I am thinking about getting some tools for my birthday later on this month and cant decide which ones to get. Hubby said order what I need, I have a Foredom and polishing mops etc, but someone said a bench polisher would be ideal, I make about two or three items a week so not a vast empire, and as I make it in a spare bedroom which is kitted out with a spare bed, carpet etc dont want to make too much mess. I dont really need a grinder, but wondered about a polisher, once more cant make it too big and clunky because I am attached to another house for one and its too cold out in the garage.

  2. #2
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    Aug 2012
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    Fearn North East Highlands
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    Default

    Hi pat, Top of my list would be a tumble polisher,I have the one with the double drum, it was on offer, I only ever use the one drum. It could stay in the garage out of sight and sound. Happy birthday when it comes.

    DONNIE


    www.silver-n-things.co.uk

  3. #3
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    Default

    Hi Donnie, I have a tumble polisher already, but I use my Foredom drill as well to polish. Its just that I cant make up my mind what is more useful, I was originally thinking about getting a KnewConcept Saw but not sure if that would help me saw in a straight line any more than the cheapie one that I have now. I have got a lot of other tools and really not lacking much, but as I am a hobby jeweller, its difficult to know where to draw the line.

  4. #4
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    Pat, check out these polishing / grinder kits. They are not massive machines, quite cheap and very useful. These bench polishers make most polishing quicker and much easier than using small mops in a pendant drill. You could get the OH to make a decent box to contain the motor and keep the process clean. See; http://www.metalpolishingsupplies.co...der-polishers/ You will also find a grinder useful, for sharpening and shaping tools or shaping hammers.

    James

  5. #5
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    Apr 2010
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    Hi James, I have a grinder out in the garage, but its noisy and belongs to a builder friend that let me have it on permanent loan, the little polisher looks a useful tool though. Hubby isnt the most practical man in the world, he can do just about anything with computers, phones, and technology type things, like computers that wont boot up, he can bypass the boot system and get them started again, and is always changing the "rom" on mobile phones, getting them to work quicker etc. The latest thing he has done is to rig up a camera in our lounge so he can watch the dogs from anywhere he can get a mobile signal, which is useful in some ways, you can see what the dogs are doing, but cant stop them because you are too far away. Lol.
    I think I may go for the polisher, I can make a box of some sort even a cardboard one would do for time, and I dont suppose its any more messy than using the pendant motor. I have a big squash bottle with the top and bottom cut out for the worst bits.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
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    491

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    Hi Pat,
    I have a faithful old polishing motor. It has no switch, so I can only turn it off at the wall and if I ever got any loose clothing caught up in it, I'd be straight to A&E, but I wouldn't be without it. It really speeds up the polishing process and is great for final finish.
    However, it really does fire a lot of debris around the room. The dust gets into EVERYTHING, so be a little careful where you use it if you haven't got great extraction.
    I used to polish in the house a lot and I can say for certain the sky boxes and games consoles have a nasty habit of packing up if they get too full of rouge

  7. #7
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    Apr 2010
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    Oh. The Foredom kicks up a bit of fluff/rouge etc. Havent got extraction, can't fit it very well as we have relatives staying from time to time, feel guilty as it is, they have to climb into bed from one side as my bench is the other. May give it some more thought. Good job you wrote when you did as I was just about to order one. I only do it for a hobby so only about two or three pieces a week.

  8. #8
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    If I have a lot of polishing, I have an old Henry vacuum cleaner and I switch it on and hang the suction pipe over the rouge mop and it works like an extraction unit and sucks up all the fluff in the air.

    James

  9. #9
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    I have a Kirkby vacuum, but that has a wide attachment nozzle which I think is for curtains which would probably suffice. Good idea, do you think it would be worthwhile for the small amount I would use it.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Patstone View Post
    I have a Kirkby vacuum, but that has a wide attachment nozzle which I think is for curtains which would probably suffice. Good idea, do you think it would be worthwhile for the small amount I would use it.
    I only link up the Henry if I am going to be polishing for a couple of hours. I actually collect all the muck from the tripoli mop and add it to my floor sweep as over the years it collects valuable metals. The last bag of floor sweep and polishing collections I sold, which had taken 8 years to collect, gave me a clear profit of 320 when melted and assayed.

    James

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