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Thread: Lampert - PUK4 Welding System

  1. #1
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    Default Lampert - PUK4 Welding System

    Hi All,

    Can someone explain to me in layman's terms the advantage of using something like the PUK 4 welding machine by Lampert?

    I've been looking at the demonstration videos and Im a bit perplexed to be honest. I can understand the 'filling porosity' application, but does it differ from soldering that much ( I.E. do you still need to solder over welds? )

    Im also assuming that it doesn't generate heat like soldering does so guess theres no issues regarding fire scale or being ultra careful around gems etc?

    Sorry for the daft questions, but looks like an incredible piece of equipment, albeit very expensive and puzzling!

    Nick

  2. #2
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    A very quick reply: it is indeed a great piece if kit. The weld is great because there is no visible joint as the surface becomes all parent metal so to speak. But unless you take a long time filling a 'V' joint it is not awfully strong. So for example, if you are sizing a ring, weld the outside and sides of the shank and then solder the inside - best of both worlds!

    Fantastic with platinum. Got to go now. ATB

  3. #3
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    Thanks for that info.

    So if the weld becomes parent metal, does this mean that no fillet is created and that no kind of solder is required? Do the finished items need pickling as per usual or is fire scale on the likes of silver non existent?

    Apart from the initial cost, I'm trying to find the 'cons' of using such a system. Does the argon gas ( that presumably needs refilling ) cost a bomb?

    Nick

  4. #4
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    Pure Argon is about 35-40 per fill. You don't need solder if you do a proper 'V' weld starting at the bottom and gradually working your way towards the wider bit. You then have to go proud of the surface and grind back to flush using a compactor in a flex shaft.
    There is little heat exchange so you can work directly next to a stone without fear of harming - even re tipping with the stone in situ is fine!

    I don't work in silver or 9 carat so can't comment with regard to fire scale but 18 carat of all colours and platinum is fine.

  5. #5
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    If I had the machine, I would also hope to use it for fixing snake and other complex chain to chain ends and also for tacking together components prior to soldering, so dispensing with clamps, or binding wire and enabling single-stage soldering. Dennis.

  6. #6
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    I can see how it would make repairs an easier task as well as the small fiddly tasks.

    If for example you were to tack something onto a ring shank to hold it in place, would you then use traditional solder over the top of the weld, or around it to finish off the job? I'm having difficulty in understanding if the PUK machine makes a flush weld, or a fillet similar to traditional soldering.

    Nick

  7. #7
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    By the way, the snake chain arrived for the pendant, all soldered OK.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick martin View Post
    If for example you were to tack something onto a ring shank to hold it in place, would you then use traditional solder over the top of the weld, or around it to finish off the job? I'm having difficulty in understanding if the PUK machine makes a flush weld, or a fillet similar to traditional soldering.
    Nick
    I don't know much about welding, but have always presumed that you get a series of fused spots. Adding conventional solder would then infiltrate all the gaps, provided they were only slight as in normal soldering. Dennis.

  9. #9
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    Thanks Dennis, that's my conclusion too.

    Nick

  10. #10
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    The idea is that you overlap the welds to give an invisible seam.
    ATB Martin ...

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