Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 24

Thread: How do you bend your rings?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    84

    Default How do you bend your rings?

    I've finally gotten around to buying a ring mandrel so I can make rings properly (the last one was rounded up on a punch that came with my wooden dapping block!). Now I'm trying to figure out the best way to form the ring before soldering shut. I've seen people use ring-bending pliers, a mallet and mandrel, a swage block... So I thought I'd ask here what you all do and why it works well before I order still more tools. Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    England
    Posts
    1,899

    Default

    I use half round pliers to bend the ring shank into shape, then I clean the shank joint, bind it together with binding wire and then solder it together with hard solder. After pickling I clean up the solder joint with a file and paper, then finally use a ring mandrel and a mallet or hammer to tap the shank perfectly round.

    James

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Birmingham, UK
    Posts
    188

    Default

    If necessary, I anneal the wire first then use a pair of half round pliers to make the ring into an odd oval sort of shape and get the two ends completely flush although a lot of people like to do it differently. I solder, pickle, clean it up then use a plain steel ring mandrel and mallet to get it to the right shape. I try not to do too much hammering so as not to stretch the ring. For sizing, I use a Wheatsheaf mandrel but for general shaping, any old unmarked/plain steel mandrel is good

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Central London
    Posts
    8,249

    Default

    Traditionally people use ring pliers as mentioned above they have one flat beak and one rounded beak. The muscle is provided by you. One or both beaks can also be covered in polythene tubing to save marking your metal.

    My life took a turn for the better when I bought this ring bending tool shown below. It will not only bend stout wires, but also help you to close the join before soldering. You are not warned that you also need a narrow leather strap over the moving jaws to avoid marking the outer surface of the ring.

    When bending up stout wires it is best to curve the ends first and the centre last.

    Against tradition, I don't bash my rings on a mandrel, but make them a little smaller than needed and then stretch them to size on a ring stretcher, which which is fast, accurate and preserves the finish. Dennis
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Using Tubing.jpg   Ring Bending Tool.jpg   r Upright Ring Stretcher.jpg  

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Birmingham, UK
    Posts
    188

    Default

    Dennis, oh how I long for a good upright ring stretcher! I only have a cheapo one from eBay and I'm too scared to use it because, well, on the packet it was called a "Ring Stracher"...

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Staffordshire
    Posts
    1,727

    Default

    Large half round pliers, the pressure on the metal to create the bend is exerted by you, not the pliers, they just hold the metal as you move it through the jaws to create a circle, I saw through both ends of the ring and file up as necessary to ensure a complete match, once soldered, I tidy up any solder and then true up on a mandrel (preferabley to size too!!).

    Emily....don't do it!! Or at least check it out on a plain band or 2 that you can afford to scrap.........in my experience a good upright ring stretcher comes at a price (one which I can't afford, but have had access too!!) and cheaper imports just do not compare.....off shape, ridging (spelling??), demolishing......

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    84

    Default

    Interesting, sounds like a majority vote for the ring-bending pliers. I guess I'll put 'em on the shopping list.

    Emily, I'd be scared of something called a "Ring Stracher" too! Sounds painful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Birmingham, UK
    Posts
    188

    Default

    Haha! I know, it sounds like some sort of torture device. Either way, it is staying safely stashed away in my tool graveyard. The name "ring stracher" really doesn't inspire much confidence!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    34

    Default

    Hi there Eirish,

    I do the half round plier thing as described by Goldsmith but I find a few small things make a bit of difference for me - firstly to bend the ring into a D-shape makes soldering easier. The soldered bit is in the middle of the straight line of the D, as soldering on a curve holds much more room for slippage and error, I find. It's much easier to line up two straight bits of metal than two shaped bits on a curve. Especially with shaped or thicker wire. When the D is nicely soldered together you just tap it on a mandrel into shape. Secondly I am a total pansy and tend to make marks with my huffing and puffing to bend thicker wire so like Dennis I find soft kid leather between the pliers a must (I got a free off cut from a tailor). I am so lazy with filing off scratches so I really try to not make any in the first place. Also I put the ring in a vice (with leather between the ring and the vice) and tap with a hammer into the D shape where possible, as you don't need much muscle for that and it creates a very snug fit. You may not be as puny as me though! Lastly, keeping the metal well annealed and soft throughout makes the metal nicer to handle and easier to bend. Good luck.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Exeter, Devon
    Posts
    1,783

    Default

    That looks a handy set of tools Dennis, I may invest in the ring bending tool as I struggle to bend 4mm round wire into a ring shape, I love your ring stretcher too but out of my price range I expect.


    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis View Post
    Traditionally people use ring pliers as mentioned above they have one flat beak and one rounded beak. The muscle is provided by you. One or both beaks can also be covered in polythene tubing to save marking your metal.

    My life took a turn for the better when I bought this ring bending tool shown below. It will not only bend stout wires, but also help you to close the join before soldering. You are not warned that you also need a narrow leather strap over the moving jaws to avoid marking the outer surface of the ring.

    When bending up stout wires it is best to curve the ends first and the centre last.

    Against tradition, I don't bash my rings on a mandrel, but make them a little smaller than needed and then stretch them to size on a ring stretcher, which which is fast, accurate and preserves the finish. Dennis

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •