Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17

Thread: Using silver paste on a burnable core

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    49

    Default Using silver paste on a burnable core

    Hello I have just bought some silver paste and would love to paint it onto leaves, twigs, petals...that kind of thing to make little silver replicas. Does anybody know of any tutorials that I can watch, or have any words of wisdom for me? Thank you everso x x x

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Central London
    Posts
    8,420

    Default

    This is usually done by electroforing:http://www.caswelleurope.co.uk/Cop-E...kit-1litre.htm, Dont Know about paste. Dennis.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Birmingham, UK
    Posts
    188

    Default

    Ahhh, do you mean the PMC type paste or silver conductive paint for use before electroforming?

    I've used the PMC paste before just because it looked kind of fun but I only used it with that burnable cork clay stuff. I got some good results but it would have been better if I was kiln firing, I don't have a kiln so used my torch. I've also used silver conductive paint to practice electroforming. Let me know what type you were referring to and I can probably give you a bit more advice/unearth some tutorials

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    49

    Default

    Thanks Dennis and Emily, I have bought the art clay silver paste, my tutor used a leaf and made a beautiful pendant, a compete replica in silver, stunning! I could wait and ask her, but I'm a tad excited and impulsive!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Birmingham, UK
    Posts
    188

    Default

    That sounds beautiful! As far as I know, it is very similar to the results you can achieve with electroforming but without the electroforming equipment and chemicals. I used the cork clay and painted the silver paste onto a piece of cork clay that I had shaped into a little puffy heart shape. I applied several layers of the paste, letting each one dry before applying the next one. I made a small hole in an inconspicuous area to prevent the piece exploding during firing...don't want an exploding heart! I torch fired it, the cork clay burnt away and left me with a little hollow heart shape. It was fun but it must have been at least 5 years ago so I can't give much advice. I'll see if I can find some tutorials

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    49

    Default

    Ooooh, that sounds just my cup of tea, I love hearts, esp puffed ones I have never used silver clay or cork clay before, but I have made hollow beads with sheet silver, so know about the inconspicuous hole I would love to see a tutorial, I did have a look today, in between half term frivolities with my children. But couldn't find any. So would appreciate a link if you ever did find one, thank you so much x x

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Earley, Berkshire
    Posts
    371

    Default

    Hi Neve,

    I make leaves using PMC slip. It's quite easy, but takes a long time since I allow to air dry between coats.

    There's a tutorial here: http://www.silverclay.co.uk/down.htm called "Instructions on how to make a unique silver pendant or earrings". They use Art Clay Silver, but it's much the same for PMC. I prefer to air dry rather than using a hair dryer after one leaf flew across the room and I also find that artificial heat tends to dry the leaf out faster and sometimes come away from the paste before you've added enough layers.

    Here's one of my leaves: Click image for larger version. 

Name:	HazelGreen.jpg 
Views:	39 
Size:	52.1 KB 
ID:	4359

    Let me know if you have any more questions.
    Elaine at Mead Moon
    Mead Moon
    My Etsy shop

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    49

    Default

    Wow Elaine! That is stunningly beautiful! Thank you so much for taking the time to show me, I will take a look at the tutorial when my girls are in bed and come back to you! Excited!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Manchester
    Posts
    14

    Default

    I've had success making the slip from dried-out clay that I ground up in a pestle and mortar, it's useful for using up old lumps.
    Leaves usually have more texture on the underside. After pottering about in the gardens I've had success with wild strawberry, brambles, rose and mint.
    If the leaves are thin they may curl up, sticking them to card with PVA helps a lot.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Earley, Berkshire
    Posts
    371

    Default

    Hi Methuselah, Yes, it's always the back of the leaf that you add the clay to and I usually make slip from old clay as you do. Far cheaper than buying the paste.

    I like your tip on using PVA to stick the leaf down - many thanks for that. Some of the more delicate leaves are very tricky to hold while you're painting the layers.

    So far I've made leaves from Hazel, Hawthorn, Oak, Holly, Buddleia, Osmanthus, Cotinus, Honeysuckle, Fig, different varieties of Acer, Ivy and Malva and a few other plants in my garden which I haven't identified. The Holly & Ivy were the least successful since they have few interesting veins.
    Elaine at Mead Moon
    Mead Moon
    My Etsy shop

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •