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Thread: Polishing oxidised jewellery

  1. #1
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    Default Polishing oxidised jewellery

    HI,
    Anyone out there with advice on how to polish oxidised jewellery to shine it and seal it?
    Cheers
    hayley

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hayles Gerry View Post
    HI,
    Anyone out there with advice on how to polish oxidised jewellery to shine it and seal it?
    Cheers
    hayley
    Unless It has porous stones, such as coral and turquoise, most tarnished jewllery can be revived by a thirty second dip in Goddard's Silver Dip from the supermarket. Once rinsed and dried it can be further polished up with a silver cloth.

    Waxing with Renaissance Wax or a spray furniture polish will protect it to a degree, but for storage there is nothing better than anti-tarnish tabs in a closed box or bag. Find them on line.

    There have been lots of debates about this which you can find by putting key words into our search box, top right. Dennis.

  3. #3
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    Is this to polish jewellery that you've deliberately oxidised?

    If so, I either use micromesh to rub back and get some nice highlights, and I happily tumble this type of piece for shine.

    I don't generally seal silver jewellery, but if I wanted to, I'd use either protectaclear or GerMar.

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    Ha, If I have misunderstood you Gerry, as George suggests and you want to finish blackened jewellery, then I would still wax it, because that gives depth to the colour and then I would polish it up with a soft cloth.

    Should you want an antique effect then use an impregnated silver cloth first to bring up the highlights. Which answer were you after by the way? Dennis

  5. #5
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    Default Polishing oxidised silver jewellery

    Hi,

    Thanks for all your advice.

    Do you tumble oxidised pieces? If so, do you need to change your water for the next tumble with non-oxidised pieces?

    I am looking for a shiny, velvety texture.

    Cheers

    Hayley

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    Hi Hayley,
    I'm not quite sure how shiny and velvety go together as I would always consider the latter to be slightly matte, but yes, I happily tumble oxidised pieces.

    I change my water every time I tumble. However, provided you have neutralised the oxidised piece before tumbling, it shouldn't have any effect on non-oxidised work.

  7. #7
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    I'm still confused about what we are talking about here - that's not unusual.
    Are we talking about further treatment of deliberately patinated pieces, or work that has undergone some oxidation as a result of heating, or just trying to rejuvenate naturally tarnished with age bits?
    I've never tried but I assume tumbling something that has been blackened with los or whatever would remove the blackening - is that right?
    Last edited by trialuser; 15-11-2012 at 12:09 PM.

  8. #8
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    Default Polishing oxidised silver jewellery

    Quote Originally Posted by mizgeorge View Post
    Hi Hayley,
    I'm not quite sure how shiny and velvety go together as I would always consider the latter to be slightly matte, but yes, I happily tumble oxidised pieces.

    I change my water every time I tumble. However, provided you have neutralised the oxidised piece before tumbling, it shouldn't have any effect on non-oxidised work.
    Hi, your right, i am confusing my words. Glad to now you have happily tumbled oxidised work as I was worries the black effect may come off.

    What do you do to neutralise the work?

    Cheers

    Haylely

  9. #9
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    Hi, talking about deliberately oxidising work for the black effect.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by trialuser View Post
    I'm still confused about what we are talking about here - that's not unusual.
    Are we talking about further treatment of deliberately patinated pieces, or work that has undergone some oxidation as a result of heating, or just trying to rejuvenate naturally tarnished with age bits?
    I've never tried but I assume tumbling something that has been blackened with los or whatever would remove the blackening - is that right?
    Hi trialuser (sorry, don't know your real name!), we're talking here about something that's been deliberately patinated with LoS or (my preference) platinol. And no, tumbling does not remove the darkened effect, simply polishes it, which can help with highlighting. If any patina does flake away, it's not been properly created in the first place.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hayles Gerry View Post
    Hi, your right, i am confusing my words. Glad to now you have happily tumbled oxidised work as I was worries the black effect may come off.

    What do you do to neutralise the work?

    Haylely
    I always neutralise anything that's been chemically treated as it can cause problems for people with allergies or intolerances. You can also find that even after rinsing, some compounds remain in the nooks and crannies and can carry on affecting the piece. I use a solution of bicarbonate of soda or soda crystals (cheaper) in warm water.

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