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Thread: Setting a Trillion shaped stone

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    Default Setting a Trillion shaped stone

    Hi, can anyone offer advice on making a setting for a trillion shaped stone. I am really finding it quite difficult to get the right shape and then hold it together while soldering. Is the best way (as described by Jinks McGrath) to work out the shape/size geometrically, and then form it by scoring the bezel and folding etc or is there another way that may be less complicated? Any suggestions will be gratefully received.
    Thanks guys
    Theresa

  2. #2
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    Does it have to be a bezel? Would claws be out of the question, or even a part bezel?
    Di x

  3. #3
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    Default Example of part bezel setting

    I just tried to find an example of part bezels in my inspiration files but they're all in my journal rather than on my computer. Jewelry Artist features lots of part-bezel settings and I've been using them a lot too - they are far more stable than you think they will be. What I've found particularly attractive and useful is to use a part bezel alongside a couple of claws. So for your trillium I would place a bezel under the bottom curve of the stone and then put a claw on each of the other two sides. I hope that makes sense otherwise I'm gonna have to scan me journal pages!
    Di x

  4. #4
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    Mar 2010
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    I just wrap the bezel round the stone while it is face down on the bench, making sure my join is along one of the sides and not a corner, because doing it this way the corners are slightly rounded and not sharp angles and I have found if I make the joint on a corner it is inevitably sharp compared to the other two. Then solder it together put it back on the inverted stone and push the "bowed" sides in with a bezel pusher, to make the corners less rounded (though I also file off the corners anyways for a neater look).

    Having said this, the last trillion I set, I set in a round tube with three little notches in to support the stone and then three prongs soldered to the outside of the tube, it was quite effective (well it sold in less than a week).

  5. #5
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    sounds nice Kwant x
    Di x

  6. #6
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    OK, some of this has already been said and I apologise for any repetition. First of all, Assuming that this is a faceted stone, turn the stone upside down and keep it in place with a small blob of new Blu Tack. My mini light box (yesterday’s post) is helpful.

    The bezel is infinitely superior if it tapers slightly, so cut a bit of postcard or stiff paper to a curved strip, using a 17mm bread plate as your outer curve and cut the inner curve by eye, making the strip slightly wider than the height of the stone.

    Now fit the strip around your inverted stone, cut all but a little excess and stick it together with a drop of rapid glue. Once the glue is set you can adjust the paper with scissors and then cut it through in the middle of one of the sides, as Kwant suggested. This is now the template for your bezel and can be glued onto your metal, or just drawn around. Make sure you keep a copy.

    For a beginner I recommend the strip be cut from 0.4 mm fine silver sheet or if practicing, from copper.

    The stone must be kept level, not difficult with a taper, and only a half to a third of a mm of metal left to push over. If a pucker starts at the corners file a little as you go.

    On the other hand if you are setting a cabochon then all you need is a straight strip cut from sheet , tall enough to grip its bulge(usually 1.5-2.0mmwide).

    If you have trouble keeping the ends together for soldering, it just needs annealing until it is quite passive. Below is an old picture I just happened to have. Now I'd fuss with the edges more. Dennis.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Tourmaline Ring.jpg  
    Last edited by Dennis; 11-09-2012 at 05:36 PM.

  7. #7
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    That leathery texture on the silver is just lovely Dennis.

  8. #8
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    That ring's lovely Dennis. I particularly like the textured band and raised edge. And what a lovely stone

  9. #9
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    Mar 2010
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    Not in the same league as Dennis but after your question Theresa, I knocked up this one, it being a little easier as the trillion was fat and rounded, and Dennis note the much hated bail of the stone setting vid Di posted last week, it is the one I made as a practice having seen the vid, nothing gets wasted here :0)


    Smoky quartz trillion pendant1 by kwant, on Flickr

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis View Post
    Now I'd fuss with the edges more. Dennis.
    beautiful finish... puts mine to total shame! You can also set your piece with a raised inner wall and get the stone to sit on the wall too. Attachment 3849
    Last edited by Wallace; 11-09-2012 at 06:39 PM.

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