View Poll Results: What camera do you use to take jewellery photos?

Voters
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  • Film SLR

    0 0%
  • D-SLR

    16 57.14%
  • Compact with aperture/shutter settings

    11 39.29%
  • Compact without aperture/shutter settings

    3 10.71%
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Thread: Your compact camera can't do jewellery photography

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by ShinyLauren View Post
    Oooh, I'm getting a Canon 100mm macro soon - exciting! Just using standard kit lens that came with camera at the moment.
    It's quite nice being able to get quite so close, but you do see every little scratch that's invisible to the naked eye.

    Everything is background, nothing is post-process except for the standard sharpening and dust speck removal. It's glossy photo paper that I printed with sort of coloured gradients and circles if that makes any sense? It's looking a bit battered now though - been using it for years!
    Ah, that explains it - it's very effective; I'd wondered because of the combination of gradients & reflectiveness if you'd put the colour in afterwards.

  2. #12
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    Feb 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by ps_bond View Post
    Seems to be mostly a consensus on that - although I note one person has voted for a compact with no manual mode, I'd really like to hear their input too if possible?
    that's me

    basically I find digital cameras too confusing and technical but getting colour film printed and then scanned is a drag, so I use to use my old canon G6 on auto plus the macro attachment. I then tweak the colour balance in iPhoto if necessary. I think you've seen the pics on my website and I don't think they are too awful.

    we now have a samsung digital but that is way to complicated. I can't even turn the damn thing on!

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
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    A good and relatively cheap option is the Canon G12 compact.

    I've got both a Canon 550d and a G12 and they both take excellent images. However the macro mode on the compact is superb and if you shoot in RAW format then you can tweak the exposure / white balance and everything else until the cows come home.

    Nick

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    Vale of Evesham
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    Just got my paws on a Nikon D3100 but have only been playing taking pictures of the cat so far lol. Was v tempted by the D5100 but it was 150 more and thought this would prob suffice in case we get mugged in Barca ..............again. Grrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr
    Tasha
    X
    www.truffleandpodge.co.uk



    LOVE LIKE YOU WANT TO BE LOVED

  5. #15
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    Jul 2009
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    South Staffs
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    To add to this, I've got a Fuji Finepix 9600, which has a macro setting and aperture/shutter settings. I can't get really sharp jewellery pictures using it, so bought some closeup lens filters, but they don't seem to make much difference.
    Jules

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    Surrey, England
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    Quote Originally Posted by Petal View Post
    To add to this, I've got a Fuji Finepix 9600, which has a macro setting and aperture/shutter settings. I can't get really sharp jewellery pictures using it, so bought some closeup lens filters, but they don't seem to make much difference.
    Have you tried using a tripod, setting the camera to A and then setting it's aperture to the highest number available F8 or higher and then setting the focus mode to the central area only as most auto cameras take an average focus reading rather than a definate central area. The usual cause of slightly un sharp photos is through camera shake, which is why using a tripod is a good method to cure camera shake.

    James

  7. #17
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    Hi James, Yes, I'm using a tripod, setting the white balance etc etc, plus we have a light tent and two lights, which we usually put either side of it so there is no shadow. F8 is the highest setting it will go to.
    Jules

  8. #18
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    Aug 2010
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    Sounds like you are doing the right thing, my Lumix FZ45 will go no higher than F8 also. But my Nikon will go to F32. You may like to try some experiments by taking the same subject from different distances and using the zoom to keep the image size the same. When you use a zoom at slight telephoto, it compresses the focal distance and can make close ups look sharper.

    I took this photo with my FZ45 set on F8, standing about 4 feet away from the flower and using the zoom to frame the picture I wanted, without a tripod and the depth of focus is quite good.

    James

    Click image for larger version. 

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  9. #19
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    Aug 2009
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    London
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    Jules, have you tried using the 2 second countdown timer to take the picture, rather than pressing the shutter release button on the camera? When doing macro, even the tiniest shake from pressing the button can result in less sharp pictures.

  10. #20
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    Many thanks for the suggestions James and Lauren. I'll give both of those a go and let you know how I get on.

    xxx
    Jules

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