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Thread: A Tour Around The Ring Stretcher.

  1. #1
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    Default A Tour Around The Ring Stretcher.

    The pillar of the ring stretcher will enlarge an annealed shank by about two sizes without compromising the seam. To keep the shank from developing slight angles the ring is rotated between stretches . If it has a flat internal surface, you must also invert it from time to time, to avoid a cone shape. There are some parallel ring stretchers, but they do not allow you to see your progress in the same way. Lastly the size is repeatedly checked on a standard ring stick, as the calibrations on the ring stretcher are unlikely to correspond. Nothing is simple in jewellery making.
    The carousel at the base, which has a series of chamfered holes and a second alternative set on the underside, will reduce the size of round bands. It can also be used for closing round bands before soldering. With rings made of flat sheet it will cause the edges to curve inwards. If the resultant ring is large enough, it could then be soldered over a correctly sized flat ring to make a hollow D shape. You might have to experiment with a test piece to get this right.
    Now lift off the carousel and, if it is not hopelessly rusted on , the centre pin as well. Then, combined with a steel block, you have a super planisher for small pieces of sheet. For instance should you need to make a groove for a right angle fold, this is more easily done if the metal is first curved in a swage block at right angles to your intended groove. You then proceed with a saw and files as usual, and finally planish it flat again.
    Substitute a shallow doming block and you can close the ends of short pieces of tubing for making stone set charms. Dennis.

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    Love all those ideas and was with you right up to this.....
    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis View Post
    Now lift off the carousel and, if it is not hopelessly rusted on , the centre pin as well. Then, combined with a steel block, you have a super planisher for small pieces of sheet. For instance should you need to make a groove for a right angle fold, this is more easily done if the metal is first curved in a swage block at right angles to your intended groove. You then proceed with a saw and files as usual, and finally planish it flat again.
    Substitute a shallow doming block and you can close the ends of short pieces of tubing for making stone set charms. Dennis.
    Is it too cheeky to ask for more pictures
    Nic xx
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis View Post
    The carousel at the base, which has a series of chamfered holes and a second alternative set on the underside, will reduce the size of round bands.
    Sub.
    Some people say that you can only reduce the size of plain wed bands but if you place a polishing cloth over the hole first you can reduce millgrained edge and engraved/textured bands too.

    Andrew
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    Default Extra Pics.

    Quote Originally Posted by MuranoSilver View Post
    Love all those ideas and was with you right up to this.....

    Is it too cheeky to ask for more pictures
    Nic xx
    Dear Nic,
    Here are two more shots, which I hope is what you wanted. Much of my equipment is on boards with handles, including my Durston, so that I can move them out of the way after use. Please let me know if this does not help. Dennis.
    Thank You Andrew, that would save all those shiny marks on plain rings too perhaps.

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    Quote Originally Posted by andrew_berry View Post
    Some people say that you can only reduce the size of plain wed bands but if you place a polishing cloth over the hole first you can reduce millgrained edge and engraved/textured bands too.

    Andrew
    Great tip - thank you Andrew

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis View Post
    Dear Nic,
    Here are two more shots, which I hope is what you wanted. Much of my equipment is on boards with handles, including my Durston, so that I can move them out of the way after use. Please let me know if this does not help. Dennis.
    Thank You Andrew, that would save all those shiny marks on plain rings too perhaps.
    Perfect thanks Dennis! Great tip for the millegrain edge rings too Andrew ~ thank you
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    I'm afraid I'm hopelessly lost on this one. I can't visualise it at all - must be me, as everyone else seems to get it. It probably helps if you have a ring stretcher like the one you use Dennis - which I haven't. As most of my rings have something attached, are anticlastic or square, I've never bothered with a ring stretcher. I'd love to understand it though as I don't like to think I'm missing out on something!

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    I don't understand it either Carole - which is why I haven't made any comments!
    Di x

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    Dear Carole and Di,
    I'm sorry, I'd hate to think that I've written a dud post. Maybe it's because I have only photographed the bottom part of the ring stretcher, which thumps down when the lever is pulled. Above is a vertical tapered column, rather like a ring stick. When you pull the same leaver the column expands to stretch your ring. Let go And the ring slips down a little, alowing you to see your progress.This does nothing for square rings and will undo your anticlastic ones.
    Does that help? Kind Regards,Dennis. By the way, Carole, Do you have square ring sizers?

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    Thanks Dennis. I'll have another look at it - I'm sure it's just me!

    No I haven't been able to get square ring sizers, which is a pain. I've made my own sizers out of copper which work well as I've put the exact length of silver on each one. They're OK when people are present to try them on, but no good at all for on-line orders.

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