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Thread: Soldering silver with gems set already!!!

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
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    2

    Default Soldering silver with gems set already!!!

    Hi there,
    I have a ring that is made from three separate silver rings each with a turquoise stone set in them. Unfortunately one of the three rings has come apart from the other rings so I need to fix them back together again but if I solder this will crack the stones. Does anyone know a solution please?

    Thank you
    Jo

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Bristol
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    879

    Default

    You could try using some thing like this Heat Insulating Gel, Thermo Gel 125gm - Cooksongold.com but I guess you couldn't 100% guarantee that the stone would survive.
    Lucinda

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    Central London
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    Default Repair Of Turquoise Ring

    Unfortunately, I am pretty sure that you will have to unset the stones before your repair (see my recent post about using a scalpel or craft knife for this). Turquoise is easily destroyed by heat and silver is a terrific conductor. I have tried using heat barrier paste with silver and had no success myself. Sorry to be so negative, but if you find a shortcut please tell us. Kind regards Dennis.

  4. #4
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    Jul 2009
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    Romsey
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    Take the stones out, solder and reset. For more resilient stones I might stuff them in wet sand or underwater, but for something like turquoise I wouldn't risk it. YMMV.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Southampton, UK
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    I'm with Peter and Dennis. I've never had much success with heat paste on stones. It's useful for protecting joints that have been soldered already, but I've found that it you put it on thick enough to protect the stones, it's too much of a heat sink.
    Taking the stones out is easier than you think if you take it slowly. Here's a turquoise ring that I repaired last year Daisychain Designs: A couple of repairs
    Jo
    Daisychain Jewellery - Handcrafted sterling silver jewellery and jewellery tuition
    www.daisychainjewellery.co.uk
    www.daisychaindesignsjewellery.blogspot.com

  6. #6
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    Jul 2009
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    Market Deeping
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    Jo Love the blog post about the repair ~ it's why I normally give a polite no too
    Nic xx
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  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Southampton, UK
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    Quote Originally Posted by MuranoSilver View Post
    Jo Love the blog post about the repair ~ it's why I normally give a polite no too
    Nic xx
    It was rather difficult when my OH came home with it - as it was then in the house it was difficult to say no! I did charge a decent price for the repairs though (there was another very easy to repair ring too), and it didn't put OH's friend off as he's asked me to do more!
    Jo
    Daisychain Jewellery - Handcrafted sterling silver jewellery and jewellery tuition
    www.daisychainjewellery.co.uk
    www.daisychaindesignsjewellery.blogspot.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Posts
    68

    Default

    Another vote for removing them here. I spent ages making myself a cocktail ring made of silver and a gorgeous smokey quartz stone. The ring shank was too big, so I planned to solder in a strip of silver inside the shank, thereby making it smaller. What I should have done was remove the stone first. What I actually did was try to solder it in, and then watch with dismay as the beautiful quartz changed from brown to clear white...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Manchester
    Posts
    4

    Default

    I'd go with everyone on unsetting, heat paste only really good with diamonds, sapphires, and rubies. Do you know anyone with a PUK welder? They are an amazing piece of kit, I've rebuilt up a damaged bezel against an emerald with 22ct without any damage. I'd say great for repair work. The PUK is OK on silver with a bit of practice, applying typical welding know how, no fire stain, no having to reset stones, etc. So can save loads of time too. I use the gap fill mode on mine as it's the most effective for silver but the latest model has a special setting just for silver which gives vastly improved results. If you are worried about heat from the PUK? virtually nill, I've had 1 or 2 pin sized burns to my finger tips or nails, but thats usually because they are millimeters away from the work whilst holding it . Welds tend not to be as strong as a good solder joint but still good.
    Last edited by Sparkle Designer; 10-04-2010 at 11:58 PM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    2

    Default

    Thank you all for your feedback, greatly appreciated. I shall crack on with unsetting the stones and soldering the join, wish me luck

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