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Thread: A Question about lead

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    158

    Default A Question about lead

    I've looked at some of the older posts about using lead in a tobacco tin to do some metal forming. Luckily I popped on here first to see that it is extremely toxic when it's being melted. I was about to do this on my cooker!!!!

    Does anyone have a method of doing this? Maybe outside in the garden? Or an extractor fan?
    I've ordered a load more lead, so thinking about cancelling now. Eek!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Manchester UK
    Posts
    942

    Default

    I have done this outside on a Calor gas stove with and a small cooking pan worked great took a bit of time to melt everything. Lead is bad for you and the fumes off melted lead are even worse. I wouldn't recommend it but if you do make sure you have a mask and correct PPE

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Posts
    158

    Default

    Ok thank you. I’ll look into the PPE

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    1,848

    Default

    Lead requires very specialised PPE normal surgical mask is just a waste of time, just do it out side with a fan to create a positive air flow, wear disposable gloves, I have been melting lead to make projectiles for 35+ years this way, and have no ill effects, (proven by blood tests).

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    East Anglian
    Posts
    643

    Default

    Lead….yes toxic especially to young children, but remember lead was used for domestic and mains water supply pipes and if I remember correctly hot water as well. only banned in 1970 and paints containing lead banned in 1978. In hard water areas the insides of the pipe developed an impervious layer, but in soft water areas no. I believe there are still old houses with it in situ!
    In my youth…40s / 50s balsa-wood cement came in lead tubes. We used to chew it! Anglers used lead shot and usually nipped the split shot onto their lines with their teeth….I did! Plumbers worked with it all day.
    Melting a lump of lead in the open occasionally I would think posses no real risk as long as you don’t hang your face over the tin and inhale deeply. Sensible caution …..outside , don’t chew it ! wash your hands after manipulating it, great care if sanding it…..
    I am near 80, and still plodding along…..
    David


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Central London
    Posts
    8,851

    Default

    This idea was first proposed here by James Miller, our highly prized professional member sadly now deceased. who formed petals, leaves and other delicate shapes on lead.
    His work can still be found on line, if you google James Miller Goldsmith. He also promoted the Knew products.
    Note small fragments of lead will quickly contaminate and blemish precious metals in your work area. Dennis.

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