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Thread: Hall marking quandry

  1. #11
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    Feb 2016
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    Yes.


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  2. #12
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    They are quite some weight! Are they not worth more by making into flat sheet, turning into all sorts of separate things that don't require hallmarking? More profit to you then.
    Jules

  3. #13
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    Feb 2016
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    Yes I suppose true! But it seems a simple and quite artistic thing to do. Also time wise I would think much less. It seemed a fun thing to do, but the sequelae of problems is putting me off continuing!
    Thank you all for your comments!
    David


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  4. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
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    928

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    If you have a reasonably sized catch like a hook and loop one they'd put the hallmark on there. Or if you add a reasonably sized closed ring to your pendant they'd stamp that.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    May 2023
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ruedeleglise View Post
    I have made a necklace by melting down scraps of silver into 4 balls weighing in at a total of 16.4 g so exceeding the exempt weight for hallmarking. These balls are irregular with no flat surface at all. I drill each ball and suspend them on 1 mm silver wire finished with a eye through which a chain can pass.
    How can this be hallmarked ? Or can it qualify as being exempt as each component is less than 7.85 gms?
    David….Ruedeleglise.


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    As each component of your necklace is less than 7.78 grams, it may qualify for exemption from hallmarking in the UK. However, if you want to have your necklace hallmarked.

    There a way, to send your necklace to a UK Assay Office, where a professional will examine it and apply the appropriate hallmarking. However, given the irregular shape of your necklace, it may be difficult to apply a hallmark in the traditional sense. In this case, the Assay Office may suggest alternative methods for marking your necklace, such as laser marking or stamping on a small tag that can be attached to the necklace.

  6. #16
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    Jul 2009
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    Romsey
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    Amusing though this use of AI has been, I think that's quite enough.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
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    East Anglian
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    I have opted for laser marking as a default anyhow!


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  8. #18
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    Dec 2009
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    Central London
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    For laser marking it's always a good idea to create a small flat surface, and mark it with a coloured waterproof pen, so that you get the size you want where you choose to have it. Dennis.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2016
    Location
    East Anglian
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    Well I have 17 pieces being returned today from London….I will see what they have done. Thanks for the advice .


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  10. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    Scotland
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    Quote Originally Posted by ps_bond View Post
    Amusing though this use of AI has been, I think that's quite enough.
    It has rather parroted every bit of advice so not very intuitive in conversation!

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