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Thread: Methods to improve skills

  1. #1
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    Default Methods to improve skills

    So Ive been really keen on ways beyond just practicing to improve my skills, especially since I value mentorship, and I came across a program nearby that teaches the essentials amongst other things, and seems to have more a focus on benchwork rather than just theory. Its only 4 months and I feel like I could possibly learn a lot from it.

    I wonder if people here have any experience with formal education with learning their jewellery making? As opposed to completely self taught. Would you recommend for or against it?

    There are also longer programs that are a couple years long, but I do not think I have the funds or time to invest that much into this. Would I be better off using funds for base materials to practice with rather than committing to tuition?

    And are apprenticeships existent within the profession?

    Just curious as to what people's experience with developing their craft is, and what they think the pros and cons are of each method of learning!

  2. #2
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    From a personal point of view I would agree that tuition and learning bench skills would be really valuable to you. I did a 4 year course over 40 years ago but you never stop learning new skills although I’m amazed at how much I’ve forgotten I also learnt!

  3. #3
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    If you can afford school great or do an apprenticeship.
    I learn from YouTube videos and forums.
    Enjoy,
    Cliff

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clifford Manthey View Post
    If you can afford school great or do an apprenticeship.
    I learn from YouTube videos and forums.
    Enjoy,
    Cliff
    We don’t pay for our further education in Scotland otherwise many of us wouldn’t have been at Art School

  5. #5
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    Hi there! I have been an apprentice and I am self-taught. I would absolutely recommend either some sort of in-person education (like the program you mentioned) OR finding someone willing to teach you while you work for their business. I was fortunate to find a job where they taught me all the essential basic skills. From there I have been able to grow my education on my own. I genuinely believe my time learning from someone who knew what they were doing to be a huge advantage. If you can find a job that will pay you to learn, that is, in my opinion, your best option. If you can afford any sort of formal training, I think it's worth the investment to learn the basics. Once you have a good grasp of the basics, you can move into a more self-taught style. That would be how I would do it if I had to start all over again. Best of luck!

  6. #6
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    There are two aspects of jewellery making:
    Technical proficiency, and design. Unfortunately they are not always found in the same tutor.
    Gain only the first, and you will become a jobbing jeweller.
    Be only a brilliant designer, and your work will not be of jewellery standard. Dennis.

  7. #7
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    There are lots of short one or two day intense targets specialist subjects courses put on by established practitioners ...stone setting...for eg, or my chum Steven Goldsmith is in huge demand for his two day polishing courses. -
    Author: Pearls A Practical Guide
    www.pearlsapractical.guide
    www.Pearlescence.co.uk

  8. #8
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    [QUOTE=Dennis;114362]There are two aspects of jewellery making:
    Technical proficiency, and design. Unfortunately they are not always found in the same tutor.
    Gain only the first, and you will become a jobbing jeweller.
    Be only a brilliant designer, and your work will not be of jewellery standard. Dennis.[/QUOTE

    Or have the artistic side and have those two aspects taught at the same time and hopefully you have a chance

  9. #9
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    Aug 2022
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    Hey thanks for the responses!

    Ive spent quite a bit of time trying to learn informally online via youtube and some other sites demos. I find them interesting but frustrating to properly learn from.

    And Ive been lucky enough to attend some one day workshops when they pop up in my area. I really enjoy them and always learn something, but since they are group sessions, and often more social rather than technique focused, I feel awkward asking a bunch of learning/student questions during.

  10. #10
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    Well keep asking here too. That's what forum are for.

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