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Thread: USA and hallmarking

  1. #1
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    Default USA and hallmarking

    I want to send some pendants to a friend in the US - I am only charging the cost of the silver, my time is a gift to them.

    They are overweight for hallmarking though. If they are going straight to the US do I have to get them hallmarked? I have no problem in describing them as "white metal" and they'll be about 15 worth of silver in each one. I know the US has no requirement to hallmark so once they get there they are legal but these won't ever be sold even in the US.

    I've done a google search and am getting both yes you must hallmark and no it's fine not to!

    Does anyone know for sure please?

  2. #2
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    Default

    I raised this a few months ago although it was a sale. Jules contacted the assay office and they stipulated that as the item is made in the U.K. then it must be hallmarked no matter where it’s going and what their particular regs are. As you think it’s never likely to be sold then I think you have to phone the assay office yourself to clarify that point. Maybe pass on that bit of info for the rest of us too.

  3. #3
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    My understanding is that hallmarking is only a requirement if an item is being sold as precious metal.

    I would tend to avoid this if it's a gift and simply describe as white metal for customs purposes - not least because you lose any postal insurance if for any reason they're not delivered and you have not used the 'appropriate' sending method. I also think it renders them more vulnerable to theft within the postal system.

  4. #4
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    I agree - I want to send it as low profile as possible. As always the value is a matter of opinion. I know what I would charge for them if I was to sell this design but I will be quoting the value at spot price, the difference being considerable!

  5. #5
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    https://www.gov.uk/government/public...idance-summary

    "All items (over certain weights) sold in the UK and described as being made from gold, silver, platinum or palladium must have a legally recognised hallmark. The law is set out in the Hallmarking Act 1973 (which has been amended and updated on various occasions)."

    The wording states "sold in the UK" as it's not being sold in the UK then it does not need to be hallmarked.

  6. #6
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    I would go with that Alistair, also the UK hallmark is not recognised in most of Europe anymore since Brexit and you need to have the country your selling to apply the hallmark. In the USA Im sure yu can apply your own hallmark but not 100%

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by alastairduncan View Post
    https://www.gov.uk/government/public...idance-summary

    "All items (over certain weights) sold in the UK and described as being made from gold, silver, platinum or palladium must have a legally recognised hallmark. The law is set out in the Hallmarking Act 1973 (which has been amended and updated on various occasions)."

    The wording states "sold in the UK" as it's not being sold in the UK then it does not need to be hallmarked.
    It is being sold in the UK. The contract for sale has been formed in the UK. The final destination doesn't matter.
    Author: Pearls A Practical Guide
    www.pearlsapractical.guide
    www.Pearlescence.co.uk

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by josef1 View Post
    I would go with that Alistair, also the UK hallmark is not recognised in most of Europe anymore since Brexit and you need to have the country your selling to apply the hallmark. In the USA Im sure yu can apply your own hallmark but not 100%
    They don't have hallmarks in the USA. They usually call brand marks etc hallmarks, as I repeatedly point out on various forums. I'm very tedious! Consumer law is much more lax. Eat the chlorine washed chicken and sue when you die from the salmonella poisoning. They still allow nickel too
    Author: Pearls A Practical Guide
    www.pearlsapractical.guide
    www.Pearlescence.co.uk

  9. #9
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    I see what you mean I think the jeweller applies the mark too so no testing of quality, I wonder if you could argue that its sold where the server is located (if you sell online) just an idea.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by pearlescence View Post
    It is being sold in the UK. The contract for sale has been formed in the UK. The final destination doesn't matter.
    https://assets.publishing.service.go...tober-2016.pdf

    Page 13

    It's an exempt article.

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