Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: Keum Boo and burnising marks showing up on photos

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2021
    Posts
    9

    Default Keum Boo and burnising marks showing up on photos

    Hi there! I use 24 carat gold on silver and burnish it with an agate burnisher. To the naked eye, you don't notice the burnishing marks.

    However, when it is photographed on white background as a cut-out under lots of lights, the burnishing lines are picked up and reflect the light differently.

    Am I pressing too hard with the burnisher? Can the lines be removed with pumice powder? Hot pickle has not removed them.

    I was thinking about putting the pieces into the polishing barrel to burnish the whole textured surface. Is this ok?


    What is the rule with keum boo pieces into the tumbling barrel?

    Or should I be polishing the lines out with my flex shaft? Many thanks!!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    3,015

    Default

    Can’t answer on the tumblers but you could try a metal burnisher. It depends what the piece is but my metal one is finer and smoother than the agate. If I remember you are also supposed to give it a very light sand but that depends on the thickness you’ve put on and how well it has taken. I’ve never had burnishing lines but then sometimes I overlay to get the effect I want

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Central London
    Posts
    8,293

    Default

    Andrea, in keum boo the burnishing lines will show in photographs, although they can be modified by the type of burnisher used, as Caroline has said, and the length and direction of the strokes.

    You can also distract from them by having a texture underneath.

    If you want a more even effect, get a gold plating pen. Welcome to the forum. Dennis.
    Last edited by Dennis; 28-04-2021 at 08:09 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2021
    Posts
    9

    Default

    Thank you for your replies! I will check out different burnishers, and look at the gold plating pens


  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    1,520

    Default

    Keum Boo it a art in itself although I was taught years ago by a Korean Master in Korea, I am only just starting to make use of the skills, (learning again) first off don't make the mistake of using gold leaf, you need gold foil which is thicker, plus the temperature needs to be just right it then blends onto the Silver correctly, I use a highly polished steel burnisher, I have not noticed any burnishing marks so far, but then most of what I have completed is textured, I will have ago at some smooth items and see what transpires.
    I would be wary about putting it in a tumbler.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    3,015

    Default

    It’s definitely an art Bob and plating would remove that particular process. It’s really challenging but then I don’t have a hot plate and either use a plate on the gas hob with all the problems of a draught taking the gold off somewhere or I heat gently over my micro torch judging where I am heat wise before adding the gold
    I bought a couple of agate burnishers when I started but find them unwieldy and always too big. I’ve got a much better finish with my steel jewellers burnisher that I’ve had for 40odd years. If I’m burnishing within a dome then I use a doming punch or a chasing tool. Never going to be a Korean master but my customers like what I do with it

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    1,520

    Default

    Yes the person I learnt from in Korea was up in mountains somewhere he was 92 years old and fitter than most 20 year olds his heat source was a flat rock heated in the fire, I was there for a TKD tournament ( yeh I used to be fit ) and my friend knew I had a interest in Jewellery and she took me to meat him. One thing I seem to be finding is Argentium does not like it, ( or I maybe I am doing it wrong ) seems to disappear into the surface.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    3,015

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by china View Post
    Yes the person I learnt from in Korea was up in mountains somewhere he was 92 years old and fitter than most 20 year olds his heat source was a flat rock heated in the fire, I was there for a TKD tournament ( yeh I used to be fit ) and my friend knew I had a interest in Jewellery and she took me to meat him. One thing I seem to be finding is Argentium does not like it, ( or I maybe I am doing it wrong ) seems to disappear into the surface.
    I had very precise designs in mind and they went out the window almost literally quite quickly! When I started looking at the work of the masters I knew then I’d never get anywhere near so I do my interpretation

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Posts
    830

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis View Post
    Andrea, in keum boo the burnishing lines will show in photographs, although they can be modified by the type of burnisher used, as Caroline has said, and the length and direction of the strokes.

    You can also distract from them by having a texture underneath.

    If you want a more even effect, get a gold plating pen. Welcome to the forum. Dennis.
    Aren't gold plating pens really expensive?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Central London
    Posts
    8,293

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sheen View Post
    Aren't gold plating pens really expensive?
    https://www.goldn.co.uk/product/batt...d-plating-pen/. Dennis.

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •