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Thread: Torch choice

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2021
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    Bristol
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    Default Torch choice

    I've got the Blazer GB 2010 micro torch which runs on butane and has a max temperature of 2500.

    It's lovely for small jobs but if there is a significant amount of metal ( especially copper) it really isn't up to the job and I'm having to use the husband's plumber's torch which has the oomph to get the solder to flow but no finesse! The flame is huge, not very controllable and no good for fiddly jobs.

    I clearly need to upgrade and I was looking at the propane Sievert torches but the beginners one which Cooksons tells me runs on propane only reaches 1900. Is this going to be any better than my Blazer? They don't say how hot the pro version gets. Would it be any hotter?

    I'm a bit intimidated by the Smith's Little Torch to be honest and don't have room for a lot of tanks. It's also probably out of budget at the moment but I'm significantly frustrated to consider it.

    Any other suggestions please for a beginner hobbyist who has already blown her budget to smithereens?
    Last edited by Caro; 22-04-2021 at 01:25 PM.

  2. #2
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    Jul 2009
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    cotswolds
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    Default

    An orca running on mapp might be a good choice. It has the advantage that you can switch it over to propane if you prefer with an adapter.

    The option is to double up with a pair of handhelds (one in each hand). Making a little firebrick 'furnace' helps with this. I know Dennis has some pictures of just this setup so hopefully he'll be along to post them!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
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    855

    Default

    Check out Kim's guide to torches: https://youtu.be/yS1zPo0t_K8
    You might like the go system she uses

  4. #4
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    Scotland
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    I’ve always had a sievert and it meets my needs but don’t know which compared to the 2 you’ve mentioned as I’ve had it a long time

  5. #5
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    Dec 2009
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    Central London
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    Dear Caro,
    First of all, the temperature of the flame is often given, but what is really relevant is the energy output, which is related to the size of the burner (the tube the flame comes out of) and the gas mixture used.

    I have not been able to find the torch you mention, but recently, due to self isolation have got myself a Cookson Max Flame pro https://www.cooksongold.com/Jeweller...rcode-999-955C, which is refillable with lighter gas, delivered with groceries from Tesco.
    To my surprise it will tackle quite large pieces, although it is quite pricey in itself and in the cost of gas.

    Hand held plumbers torches can be modified by adding an Ω shaped strip of copper, or brass to partially close the air hole, and as George has suggested it helps to work in an enclosed space made from bricks.

    The Orca torch is an improvement on the Sievert, in that it is lighter in the hand and has a ring for adjusting the air intake Dennis.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Hand Held Torch Modified.jpg   s Improvised chamber for conserving heat.sh.jpg  

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2021
    Location
    Bristol
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    Default

    Thank you everyone - such a confusing choice out there. This is a link to the one I have, it's great for small jobs but add a heavy backplate or any form of heat sink and it struggles.

    https://www.hswalsh.com/product/blaz...ng-torch-tt385

    I've also discovered that the Sievert is an awful lot cheaper from reputable building trade suppliers than it is from the jewellery suppliers - about 100 cheaper in fact ( Thanks to Andrew Berry for that tip!).

    I'm going to have to make a decision, a variation of that lovely All that Glitters bangle from Hugo ( the one he got the size wrong) is in my sights as the next project and I know I'll need a lot more firepower than I have

  7. #7
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    Mar 2021
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    Bristol
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    hi Caro..
    if I can jump in on this one ... I would highly recommend the Smiths little torch if you can stretch your budget to this mighty torch and set up ... once you get used to mixing oxygen and propane its not such a big deal and is incredibly versatile from a tiny intense flame the size of a gas lighter to a hot blasting nozzle superb for melting a full crucible of silver Grain quickly ... A must have for anyone doing a lot of casting . Oxy propane flame is Extremely hot precise and versatile And is very quick for production work such as soldering dozens of jump rings at a time. The propane needed can be very economical the sort that comes in a red bottle from a local garage or garden centre I get my oxygen from a supplier called hobbygas Who do a refundable deposit for their bottles. I also have my sievert torch connected to the same propane bottle.... all the best nick
    Last edited by nicks creative stuff; 23-04-2021 at 06:59 PM.

  8. #8
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    Jul 2009
    Location
    West Midlands
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    Hi Caro,

    I've got the same torch as you and its perfect for small jobs, but not so great for larger jobs. I've also got the plumbers torch, but as you say its all puff and no real heat!

    I'm about to get this one https://cpc.farnell.com/gosystem/mt2...70g/dp/TL19778 which seems to suit my needs and is ok for me at the current time. I'll be going for a SLT in future, along with an oxygen concentrator, but for now it will suffice for the in between stage.
    Jules

  9. #9
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    Jan 2021
    Location
    Bristol
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    Quote Originally Posted by nicks creative stuff View Post
    hi Caro..
    if I can jump in on this one ... I would highly recommend the Smiths little torch if you can stretch your budget to this mighty torch and set up ... once you get used to mixing oxygen and propane it’s not such a big deal and is incredibly versatile from a tiny intense flame the size of a gas lighter to a hot blasting nozzle superb for melting a full crucible of silver Grain quickly ... A must have for anyone doing a lot of casting . Oxy propane flame is Extremely hot precise and versatile And is very quick for production work such as soldering dozens of jump rings at a time. The propane needed can be very economical the sort that comes in a red bottle from a local garage or garden centre I get my oxygen from a supplier called hobbygas Who do a refundable deposit for their bottles. I also have my sievert torch connected to the same propane bottle.... all the best nick
    Thank you - I don't sadly have space for all the cannisters and I'm not sure I'm mentally ready for this set up yet!

  10. #10
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    Jan 2021
    Location
    Bristol
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    Quote Originally Posted by Petal View Post
    Hi Caro,

    I've got the same torch as you and its perfect for small jobs, but not so great for larger jobs. I've also got the plumbers torch, but as you say its all puff and no real heat!

    I'm about to get this one https://cpc.farnell.com/gosystem/mt2...70g/dp/TL19778 which seems to suit my needs and is ok for me at the current time. I'll be going for a SLT in future, along with an oxygen concentrator, but for now it will suffice for the in between stage.
    I think that's the one in the Kim video isn't it?

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